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MARDI GRAS 2012-AT THE BEACH

2012.02.20
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HANDS UP IN THE AIR IN HOPES TO CATCH THE BEADS THEY THROW.........I GOT TONS!!!(BUT THIS IS CLEAN FUN AND NOT LIKE THE REPUTATION THAT IS IN NEW ORLEANS........THIS WAS A FAMILY PARADE AND ALL THE KIDS HAD FUN!
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THAT EXPLAINS IT!
In 1699, Mardi Gras was first mentioned in North America. A French explorer camped by the Mississippi River, fifty miles south of today's New Orleans, named Pierre le Moyne, Sieur d'Iberville, first brought the term to the United States.

Pierre knew that in his native country, France, March 3rd was being observed as a holiday, so he named the spot he was camped on Point du Mardi Gras.

By the 1700s, Mardi Gras was celebrated in both Mobile, Alabama, and in New Orleans, Louisiana. Somewhat more sedate then today's festivities, the day was celebrated with private balls. In both cities random streets played hosts to costumed citizens.

The first documented procession for Mardi Gras took place in 1837, but it was very different then the parades seen there today. The first modern-styled parade didn't occur until 1857, and was arranged by a group called the Mystik Krewe of Comus. The floats were lit by torches and depicted scenes from mythology and literature. After the American Civil War ended in 1865, more krewes sprung up adding to the number of floats and balls.

Today's celebrations are not that different from the ones in the 1860s. There are still parades full of floats and costumed people, and there are still balls held each year. In fact, the celebration is so famous it has become major tourist attraction for New Orleans drawing in millions of people from around the world for Fat Tuesday.
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