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onlyricky
I know I know. I know there must be a topic talking about it, but I'm lazy to look after it, and also i remember there was a lot of text on it. so To beginners and to lazy ones, can you guys make it short and tell:

* Why shoot in RAW?
* Explain what Raw is and what makes it better?
*Which softwares work with raw files
and tell me something i might miss about it
AND
the most important
why they say :'' True photographers only shoot in Raw'' LOL
thanks ;)
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claudel55
* Why shoot in RAW?
***Because raw files contain all the information collected by your camera sensor (integrality of information to interpret colors, tones, etc.) - no treatment, or data loss or data transform.
* Explain what Raw is and what makes it better?
***Hard to make this answer short... but I'll try: In a 10M pixel camera each pixel reads only one color, either red, green or blue; for each pixel, RAW files contain data about the location of that pixel on the sensor, light intensity captured by that pixel when you depressed the shutter, and the ID of the color measured by that specific pixel. This is by itself useless information because each pixel only bears light intensity value for one color; thus unless you have an interpolation algorithm to assign color values for the other two colors there is nothing you can do with that file, thus why you need software to translate the file into an acceptable image.
*Which softwares work with raw files
and tell me something I might miss about it

*** Several - some available for free but they do a very average job and if you are to use these then don't bother and shoot JPEG - cheapest one is Photoshop Element 9 (to be honest it is Camera Raw bundled whit PS doing the job and making the translated file readable to Photoshop) - does a good job and cheep; next two examples I know about are Lightroom and Capture One (Lightroom is equal to PS Element for translating RAW but better than PS Element to manipulate images; next would be PS CS5 full strength... not cheep and again RAW translation is identical to what you will get from PS Element or Lightroom, the gain is at sophisticated post production. These are only a few options; other exist.
AND
the most important
*why they say :'' True photographers only shoot in Raw'' LOL
thanks ;

*** Its because it is similar to what was in the old days or traditional photography... it is you making all decisions about how your negative (the RAW) will be transferred to the paper at time of printing. By the way I believe sport, photographs and several reporters need an image in the minute and do shoot JPEG and I consider them true photographers
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revenant
Shoot in RAW: in low-light and/or contrasting light situations, RAW allows you to correct exposure, the colour cast and many other problem issues without losing detail. JPG, by comparison, is a "lossy" format in which correcting for one problem often creates another.

What is RAW: a digital negative. Not particularly useful until you work on it. It is a file format specific to each make of camera (and sometimes to each camera) in which the camera does little or no in-camera processing. RAW files are not compressed; colours are not boosted; moiré, sharpening and other operations are not carried out in the camera, unlike jpgs. This means that all RAW images are large, soft and require post-processing, at least to correct the mid-tones. By the way, "RAW" means 'raw', as in 'uncooked' or 'natural'. It doesn't stand for anything.

RAW-compatible software: your camera shipped with software that can read and convert RAW files. Nikon users have to upgrade to (and pay for) the full NX pro version with extra features. Canon users all get the same software. As mentioned above, Adobe PS, PSE and LR all read RAW files. Versions since 2010 do a much better job. I would add DxO optics, which is probably the best RAW converter on the market, but clunky. A word for users of brand new cameras: wait for Adobe to release updates. The RAW files of recently released cameras are sometimes unreadable in ACR until the next update. Freeware image editors can sometimes read "old" RAW formats, but not always. Camera manufacturers post codecs (conversion utilities) to view RAW thumbnails on Windows computers. Check their website. Users of Mac OS 10.6.x don't have this problem. It is a non-problem anyway, because RAW files can't be uploaded to the web or printed until they are converted by image-editing software.

"True photographers", etc: this is a silly conceit. Ignore it. Again, as mentioned above, sports photographers, probably the most demanding photographic genre, shoot in JPG. Personally, I shoot only in RAW because I like fiddling with my images and because I have worked extensively in low/contrasting light situations.

Other information: only a few high-end compact cameras feature a RAW option, which is a shame because most compacts over-sharpen. In the Image Quality menu on high-end compacts and in DSLRs you will find the option to shoot in both RAW and jpg format simultaneously. This chokes the buffer (when shooting in bursts, the bursts are shorter because the camera 'chokes') and also fills up your memory card very quickly, as well as doubling the number of images to sort afterwards.

When to shoot in RAW: if you don't like editing images beyond the occasional crop, don't shoot in RAW. If this is not the case and you're shooting in low-light, contrasting-light situations, RAW is a godsend. Also, if you convert to black and white, never use the 'B&W' option on your camera. Shoot in RAW and then convert.
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va000119
Thanks for info, most of which I think I understand. Just waiting for camera battery to charge and then I`m going to look for this raw setting in my menu...maybe read manual agaaaiinn.!!I have photoshopcs5 extended will this work with the raw photos. x viv
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va000119
Sorted out shooting in raw but not getting things right in raw. will keep going. does it usually take computer ages to load these?
pixel
revenant
All cameras set the greyscale at 18%. (Default setting: out of every image, 18% is set at 50% grey, i.e., the colour of concrete.) Sounds terrible, but isn't. I'm not sure why you're using the extended version of CS5. Are you a graphic artist using an old computer? It's the only explanation I can find that would explain your relative ignore of RAW and the time it takes to load RAW files in ACR. No offence meant, BTW.
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