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digitalideas
I been thinking of framing some of my photos as of late but im scared to i dont want the picture to pixellatte after i have done some adjustments and what size would be good for them? I was hoping something a bit bigger than 8x10 whats the next few sizes up? Any help or comments will be greatly appreciated.
I use a Rebel T3 Cannon
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FitrPhotography
i print mine 11x14 always, its not to big or to small...i got one hanging in an exhibit now in connecticut, print is 11x14 with a 16x20 mat.
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digitalideas
cool ill take a look at that, also since i use photoshop would that mess up the pixels when i edit the photos?
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SewerRanger
I've got a Rebel T2i and I've printed up to 24 x 20 and it looks fine. You can easily get away with an 11x10 photo - most cameras can. I wouldn't be surprised if you printed a 24x20 and it looked fine.
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SM2012
You can safely print uncropped RAW files up to A3 (11.5 x 11.7") @ 240 ppp. There are some limitations: if you used the kit lens you'll notice corner and centre softening in "large" prints which is far more apparent than on even a wide screen. Also, images that look great on a monitor are often disappointing in large prints and invariably darker. A3 and larger prints are also very unforgiving about minor compositional / lighting flaws, so you have been warned.

There are ways to enlarge images produced with "small" crop-sensor cameras.

In Photoshop:
Image > Image size > Down sample resolution from 240 to 190 and resample the image using the Bicubic Smoother (PS CS5 and older) or Bicubic Automatic (PS CS6) option.

The industry standard for resizing images is now called Perfect Resize Pro 7 (formerly Genuine Fractals) from On One Software, which comes in demo versions of a standalone product and as handy plugins for PS and LR.

You can also set print resolution to 150 ppp and still achieve perfectly acceptable results (this is the "pro" setting used by plotter and tracer prints in up to A0 ([47 x 33"]).

Most people need to go to a professional printer for anything over A4. I print up to A3+ with an Epson 3880, but that's unusual. When talking to a lab or pro, make sure you use its color profile and the CMYK Colour mode in Photoshop (Image > Mode and select 16 bit). They will supply this at no charge. This is an absolute necessity when dealing with large-scale colour images and therefore requires Photoshop. If you don't know what CMYK Colour mode is, pay the extra fee charged by the lab to do this work for you, because it does require some knowledge of gamuts, colour spaces and professional printing.

Hope that helps.

Stéfan
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