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What in the world happened to Monika (Longimanus)? Part. II

2011.04.07
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IT MAKES NO SENSE START READING THIS WITHOUT VISIT FIRST What in the world happened to Monika (Longimanus)? Part. I AT RUTH’S PB.


11. What is your favourite creature in the sea and why?
Awww… It’s not fair! Why do I always have to pick favourites? ;)
Ok, probably this guy below… I’m not even sure how it’s called… very common yet it is very difficult to get a decent shot of him, so shy. I once spent an entire dive (70 mins) playing hide and seek with him until I’ve managed to make the picture below.
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12. In My best photo 2010 you posted a photo of your son Jamie taking his first steps in diving... It seems he will follow your trail. Would you like it?
Good question. Of course I was overwhelmed by the moment I waited for so long, yet I worry too much about him and I know I’ll always do. Just like my mom did and still does, every time I travel to dive… she even tried to sabotage my first cave dive, yet she finally realized she had to let me go to live my dreams : )

13. In your PB we can admire your underwater work, but also wonderful portraits, cityscapes, fisheye photos... You're a very complete photographer. What's your favourite kind of photography?
That my blog is so eclectic rests partly upon Photoblog’s influence. My favourite kind of photography is the one that touches, provokes thoughts and emotions, stirres or just simply feasts the eyes, with one word, photography in general.

14. Have you ever seen through your lens something strange or that you shouldn't have seen?
Do you mean something like this picture below? ;) (hen night of a friend in Egypt)
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15. We all are on Photoblog to share our pictures with the world. We are sure you have some funny stories about when you were taking a picture of something. Can you tell us that story?
The funniest stories are those that made me cry the moment I experienced them, but today, from the distance of time, I can just laugh about them. Just like when a couple of years ago a local magazine asked me to provide them with underwater photographs of the Rhein river near the place I live. After an entire day of preparation I was ready for the mission. That day the water level was unusually low, and during my adventurous entry I’ve stirred up the muddy bottom so badly that the visibility was zero. I had to leave the water without a single usable shot, but with tons of mud and algae sticking all over me and my equipment, and meanwhile a storm was brewing, so the entire insect population of the area sought shelter in my car. I even scared some neighbours when I finally got home…

16. Why Longimanus? Long hands? Lol
Long fins ! ;) Probably my most memorable encounter with a shark (you might have heard about the longimanus – oceanic whitetip shark - last year as it caused lots of trouble in Sharm el-Sheikh). I wanted a profile name referring to my diving past.

17. As you should know, there is one part of the ocean that you or any scuba diving cannot go without a submarine... it is the deepest and dark part of the ocean, where there is no light and the fishes there are like monsters... would you do any of this experience if you could?
If I was born about three decades earlier, I’d have for sure joined Mr. Picard’s dive to the Mariana Trench - the deepest and darkest part of the ocean - on board the bathyscaphe Trieste…
Today I would not do it anymore, even though my fascination and curiosity haven’t changed, but as mom of a son I cant take the risk that is involved.

18. As you should know, nearby those deepest places, in the night they come from the deeps and are in the normal waters, knowing this would you go underwater in the night? And have you ever gone underwater in the night?
I can reassure you those creatures that are living in unimaginable depths wont ever come to waters reachable for mortal humans like sport divers ;) and knowing this I’d of course dive underwater at night anytime. In fact, night diving is my favourite, it is simply fascinating. You'll see aquatic life at night that you seldom see during the day, and you'll observe behaviors and phenomena unique to after-sunset environment.
Below you see a feather star that is usually hiding during the day but comes out in the night to feed on planktons.
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19. Do you collect things from your submarine divings? Like dead coral, shells, etc…
No I don’t… Not just because at certain areas it is strictly prohibited and punished, but simply because even if dead, they belong to the sea and if I’d pick them, the diver visiting the dive site after me wouldn’t have the chance to see them. And there are anyway much better things to collect: garbage and lost items of heedless divers, like diving computers, weightbelts, masks, torches, cameras etc ;)

20. Can you cry under water?
Oh I can for sure prove you can… I did, many times ;)
(Although u cant see it, but on this picture I was crying of frustration as a perfectly posing shark appeared front of my lens and I failed take a single shot due to a loose shutter release control of the housing)
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21. Who would you like to see interviewed next?

You guys do a great job picking your victims ;) and I’m sure sooner or later you catch everyone;) I’d probably pick my best friend natasa7 who introduced me to PB 4 years ago. Biology teacher, editor of a scientific magazine, creator of several documentary films… she would have a lot to tell : )



We want to thank Monika for allow us to post some of her fabulous photos and also for take the time to participate in this project.

Thanks to you all for keep supporting the interviews!
We hope you’ll be our victim sooner or later…
11 Comments
wfrnk What's #1? :-)
wfrnk · 2011-04-13: 16:53
????? Great post/interview. I really enjoyed the second part, too.
Love the first amazing shot and it goes into my fav.
Very interesting (and amusing) as I appreciated Monika's attitude and wise words.

Thanks Ricky and Monika :)
????? · 2011-04-13: 17:10
finbarr Mice interview !!
finbarr · 2011-04-13: 17:23
joycephotography Great post.
joycephotography · 2011-04-13: 17:29
danrav Nice interview!
danrav · 2011-04-13: 17:33
pickledherring Interesting interview, nice images but not too sure of the second one :)
pickledherring · 2011-04-13: 21:52
EvaLizette Good one :))
EvaLizette · 2011-04-14: 02:07
davidcardona Wonderful! Great perspective and marvellous mood! Thanks for sharing and cOngrAts!
davidcardona · 2011-04-14: 10:12
Marzijapan photo #1 is stunning, #2 turns my tummy Ewww
Marzijapan · 2011-04-14: 18:57
ASINUS Por lo que yo sé y he leído, la vida de las sirenas suele ser un poco ajetreada. Además, tienen una gran afición a emparejarse con humanos y en muchas ocasiones les causan por ello muchos dolores de cabeza. Esto ocurre porque en las profundidades marinas, las pasiones se atenúan y para vivir grandes amores, las sirenas prefieren salir del agua y si no, por qué creéis que está la literatura llena de cuentos y de leyendas acerca de estas bellísimas y seductoras mujeres acuáticas.
La consecuencia de esta pasión femenina surgida de los océanos, es que existe una raza de mujeres que lleva el mar en sus genes desde hace milenios y que no puede evitar su llamada. Sus hijos no son sirénidos, porque sólo ellas sienten ese deseo de vivir vidas anfibias, no es de extrañar, si pensamos que tienen un marcadísimo dimorfismo sexual y su macho es el narval, ese sirénido con cuerno como de caballo alado.
La consecuencia de todo esto, es que muchas mujeres viven vidas divididas, entre su amor filial y la llamada oceánica. Pero no hay problema en ello, porque si lo que se dice es cierto, las sirenas viven muchos años y tienen tiempo para todo, el problema está en que no hay forma de saber cuánto de sirena tiene cada mujer de este mundo. Yo creo que todas lo son y por eso es tan difícil llevar a buen puerto una unión, que siempre es en realidad entre dos especies distintas, que sólo por casualidad se enamoran.
Y si no creéis lo que digo, aquí tenéis esta historia que explica lo que pasó a una sirena muy antigua, justamente salida de las aguas del Mar Rojo.

La Vieja Sirena, de José Luis Sampedro

Gracias a los dos, Ricardo y Ruth. Gracias también a Monika por haberme regalado sus palabras en esta entrevista.

Un abrazo. Enric
ASINUS · 2011-04-16: 11:11
longimanus thank you so much, ruth and ricky :)
longimanus · 2011-04-22: 17:26
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Tagged: whatintheworldhappenedto monika longimanus
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