The mud that made Bengaluru.

by Ananth Monnappa July. 06, 2017 3511 views

Want to pause and travel back in time in the middle of a fast paced city ? head to this oasis of history in Krishnarajendra Market. The Bangalore fort with a history of five empires was originally built as a mud fort by Kempe Gowda I.

The Delhi gate entrance into the fort, originally was not the main entrance.

The Delhi gate entrance into the fort, originally was not the main entrance.

Kempe Gowda was a chieftain under Achyuta Deva Raya, brother of Krishnadevaraya of the Vijayanagara empire. Kempe Gowda was a well educated and a visionary who planned and built a new city (Bengaluru) for himself. The inception of the fort in 1537 was the first step in the history of Bengaluru pete (city) being created.

Huge spiked doors at the entrance.

Huge spiked doors at the entrance.

The Ganesha temple with simple characteristics.

The Ganesha temple with simple characteristics.

The fort came to be under the rule of Marata chief Shahji Bhosle after the fall of the Vijayanagara empire, defeated by the Sultans of Bijapur, the Mughals took control of the fort after they defeated the Sultans. Wodiyars of Mysore bought Bengaluru for a sum of three lakh rupees from the Mughals and naturally the fort came under their rule, until Hyder Ali defeated them and captured the city.

Ruins of beautiful carvings on the sides of the temple.

Ruins of beautiful carvings on the sides of the temple.

The huge doorways built to give way to elephants.

The huge doorways built to give way to elephants.

In 1761 Haider Ali replaced and reconstructed some parts of the mud fort into a stone fort. The Ganesha temple inside the fort was retained through every rule it came under. Tipu Sultan made the fort into a military stronghold and also used for scientific experiments building rockets.

The Hoysala symbol. Hoy meaning strike and Sala meaning the leader.

The Hoysala symbol. Hoy meaning strike and Sala meaning the leader.

The British East India Company’s army led by Lord Charles Cornwallis captured the fort in 1791 during the Third Mysore War and began dismantling the fort which went on until 1930.

Open courtyard inside the fort.

Open courtyard inside the fort.

The original parts of the mud fort with signature carvings.

The original parts of the mud fort with signature carvings.

The fort is now separated by crowded roads and metro constructions from the Tipu summer palace which houses the artifacts from Tipu’s kingdom. Today only the Delhi gate and the bastions on the Krishnarajendra road remain intact and are maintained fairly. The fort stands silent like an island surrounded by a college, shops, bus stands, and street vendors.

At first seems like prison but after looking closely maybe only a gate as there are openings inside the chambers.

At first seems like prison but after looking closely maybe only a gate as there are openings inside the chambers.

The area is populated by people largely from south Bengaluru as K R market is an important exchange point for city bus commute and also is a market place for flower sellers from the outskirts of the city.

A huge door closed for the public.

A huge door closed for the public.

The fort echoes the past through its architectural ruins. The visit to the fort made me peek through time, giving me a glimpse into the history of my city. The land that we live on bears a silent witness of time past and time yet to come.

A Canon 6D with 17-40mm and 50 mm prime lens was used for this shoot. Thank you for going through this photo experience, please share your thoughts and opinions.

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There are 8 comments , add yours!
Robert Taylor 4 years ago

I enjoy your photographs and the way you talk about them,, that is pure passion

4 years ago Edited
Ananth Monnappa Replied to Robert Taylor 4 years ago

Thank you Taylor 😊

4 years ago Edited
Ram Ya 4 years ago

Your photography and storytelling inspire me to go explore ancient temples and religious places of the world. I am sure I will start seeing and documenting them better as a result. Thanks for the inspiration

#3 love the details
#4 I like the leading lines and framing.

4 years ago Edited
Ananth Monnappa Replied to Ram Ya 4 years ago

Humbled by that. Exploring ruins and revisiting remains of the past civilisation seems great right now. Thank you for the observations.

4 years ago Edited
Rekha Poojarira 4 years ago

As usual the write up is brilliant  and  photographs are tooooo  good.. passed that fort many times but only had a glimpse   from outside..  never realised until now that  the place is so beautiful.. great going .. blush+1

4 years ago Edited
Ananth Monnappa Replied to Rekha Poojarira 4 years ago

It's never too late for a visit. Thank you for that 😊

4 years ago Edited
Yashwanth Gowda 4 years ago

Bombat bengaluru+1

4 years ago Edited
Ananth Monnappa Replied to Yashwanth Gowda 4 years ago

Bombat indeed 😊

4 years ago Edited
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