JAPAN TRAVELOGUE – DAY 13 – KONGOBU-JI TEMPLE - HEAD MONASTERY OF THE SHINGON SECT

by Antonio Gil November. 17, 2020 489 views

Roof detail featuring a dragon's head

Roof detail featuring a dragon's head

there was this warm light diffused through the window panes

there was this warm light diffused through the window panes

symmetry and harmony

symmetry and harmony

inside communicating with the outside

inside communicating with the outside

another intricate detail

another intricate detail

the cranes panel inside Ohiroma room. Painted by Kano Tanyu, official painter of the Tokugawa Shogunate,

the cranes panel inside Ohiroma room. Painted by Kano Tanyu, official painter of the Tokugawa Shogunate,

Teresa's picture

Teresa's picture

sankosho (a double ended, three pronged Buddhist ceremonial tool) - Teresa's picture.

sankosho (a double ended, three pronged Buddhist ceremonial tool) - Teresa's picture.

♫♫ Kongobuji Temple ♫♫

Kongobuji (金剛峯寺, Kongōbuji) was originally constructed in 1593 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi to commemorate the death of his mother. Later it was merged with a neighboring temple and reorganized into the head temple of Shingon Buddhism, the sect introduced to Japan by Kobo Daishi in 805 and headquartered on Koyasan.

After entering the building, taking off their shoes and paying the admission fee, visitors will first come across the Ohiroma Room which was used for important rituals and religious ceremonies. The room's gilded sliding doors (fusuma) are adorned with cranes painted by Kano Tanyu. Next to the Ohiroma Room are the Plum and Willow Rooms, named after the paintings on their sliding doors. Toyotomi Hidetsugu committed ritual suicide in the Willow Room as ordered by his uncle Hideyoshi.

Ohiroma Room

A long corridor then leads to a more recently added wing of the temple complex, where visitors are invited to enjoy some tea and a cookie in a large tatami hall. An adjacent building features rooms whose sliding doors (fusuma) are decorated by 20th century paintings of seasonal flowers and the story of Kobo Daishi, his journey to China and his founding of Koyasan. Behind the building is the Banryutei Rock Garden, the largest rock garden in Japan. Built in 1984, its large rocks from Shikoku, the birthplace of Kobo Daishi, represent a pair of dragons emerging from a sea of clouds.

www.japan-guide.com

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There are 19 comments , add yours!
José Manuel 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Templos do Oriente. Belas fotos. +1+1

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to José Manuel 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Sentia-se aquela paz Zen que só estes templos conseguem transmitir

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
R Kuerbovich 4 months, 3 weeks ago

#9Hey! Nice work of you two! I am intrigued by this piece of wood... why it's so special to be displayed?

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to R Kuerbovich 4 months, 3 weeks ago

I couldn't find anything about it. Sorry my friend.

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Totally awe inspiring. Your captures and your comments really made this post. What a beautiful place!

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Camellia Staab 4 months, 3 weeks ago

More to come my friend. Thank you 😊

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Through your fine images, the slide show and commentary, I keep having a greater respect for the Japanese culture, especially when it comes to their artistry in so many media, especially architecture, decorations and food! Thanks for sharing your wonderful experienceswith us!
+1smile+1  

#1wondering what the function of the rows of buckets along the sides of the stairway???

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Jay Boggess 4 months, 3 weeks ago

My pleasure dear Jay. I asked myself the same question in what concerns #1. 😊 Then, I found this: "Traditionally, this beautifully handcrafted wooden bucket and dipper set
was used at the start of each new year as part of a household's ritual
welcoming of the change in the calendar. At dawn, the bucket would be
filled with pure water from a nearby well, stream or river, and the
water would be placed on the Shinto altar inside the home for the gods
to imbibe. Later, the water would be used in making tea or the family
meal, to begin the new year ritually cleansed"

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Antonio Gil 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Thanks for looking up the function of those buckets! What a wonderful religious ritual to bring all the members of the sect closer to one another! Very interesting!
Hope & Pray all is going well for U2! 
Hoping & praying all this pandemic business is over sooner, rather than later, as well.
Personally I'm growing weary of seeing everyone masked up, like we're all trapped in some sort of unescapable hospital......aren't U2???

ps... maybe we should all adopt that Japanese water bucket ritual.....
smile

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Jay Boggess 4 months, 3 weeks ago

More than fed up with all this. Now, we are all lockdown in our houses in the weekends.

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Antonio Gil 4 months, 3 weeks ago

So, let me get this straight: 
It's OK to go to work during the week but you have to stay in seclusion on the weekends????
Seems they're determined to make us as miserable as they can. Maybe we ought to become rioters. 
They seem to be free to do anything they please, as the police stand by just  watching.....
Crazy times, Amigo.......but I'm optimistic that everything will finally turn out for the good......
At least we are still able to communicate with one another via computer.......
Cheers/Salud!
smile

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Jay Boggess 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Exactly. They are saying the place were there is more virus transmission is within families and so they want to prevent families from gathering and spread the virus. This is the lousiest year ever.

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Antonio Gil 4 months, 3 weeks ago

The problem is, even the top health officials don't understand the nature of this disease, fully, but they still have to make policy and enforce it......
Lord, please help us all......

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Francesc 4 months, 3 weeks ago

I love the perspectives and details of this set ....Wonderful...Happy day my friend

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Francesc 4 months, 3 weeks ago

Thanks for your never ending support my friend

4 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Sri V 4 months, 4 weeks ago

Very nice images once again. Makes me want to take a deep breath and slow down grinning

4 months, 4 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Sri V 4 months, 4 weeks ago

Exactly. That's the mood coming from this beautiful temple

4 months, 4 weeks ago Edited
Berckmans Peter 4 months, 4 weeks ago

I have always loved their style. Really enjoyed these

4 months, 4 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil Replied to Berckmans Peter 4 months, 4 weeks ago

More to come Peter. Glad you've liked them my friend

4 months, 4 weeks ago Edited
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