Shallow Depth of Field

by Ashley Boakye-Ansah June. 07, 2017 613 views

Depth of Field

Depth of field (DOF), also called focus range or effective focus range, is the distance between the nearest and farthest objects in a scene that appear acceptably sharp in an image. Although a lens can precisely focus at only one distance at a time, the decrease in sharpness is gradual on each side of the focused distance, so that within the DOF, the unsharpness is imperceptible under normal viewing conditions.

What is Shallow Depth of field?

Shallow depth of field is used primarily to isolate the subject from its environment, and it is used a lot in portrait work, macro photography, and sports photography. When the aperture is small (ex. f/16), the image has a deep or large depth of field.

Equipment & Settings

Camera - Canon EOS 1100D

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II

Focal Length - 34.0 mm

Aperture - f/4.5

Shutter Speed - 1/250s

ISO - 100

The second photo illustrated here is of two pink abstract flowers. I decided to take a picture of this because the flowers stand out against the usual flowers you see. The petals of the flowers seem like spikes extending down to the floor. it also creates a brilliant vibrant colour against the green leaves.

Pink Abstract flowers by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

Pink Abstract flowers by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

Technique

Shooting with the aperture wide open is a really good way of taking soft, naturally lit photos, as the aperture produces a shallow depth of field which allows the maximum amount of light in.

It’s also a great way of drawing the viewers eye to a certain part of the photo; the majority of the image will be out of focus.

Equipment & Settings

Camera - Canon EOS 1100D

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II

Focal Length - 34.0 mm

Aperture - f/4.5

Shutter Speed - 1/160s

ISO - 100

Locked by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

Locked by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

I was walking around my neighbourhood when I noticed gates locked with a motorbike inside. I was aiming to take a photo of the motorbike with everything out of course. Funnily it was the other way round. This photo here illustrates the sharp pattern of steel that the gates is made of. The black gates has multiple scratches and little white and grey areas which tells it has been there for time. The focal length is at it's maximum to achieve the small depth of field of the gates. I believe this was effective because the camera picked up every piece of detail that was present on the gates. The shutter speed being faster than a second, slows it down within the camera creating this photo.

Equipment & Settings

Camera - Canon EOS 1100D

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II

The Focal Length - 55.0 mm

Aperture - f/5.6

Shutter Speed - 1/50s

ISO - 100

Budding flower by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

Budding flower by Ashley Boakye-Ansah

This picture I decided to take was around my closest bus stop area. I realised the acute design that the plant and stem had so I wanted to take a closer picture to create this photo. I wanted the main focus to be the blooming flower so I placed the aperture at 5.6. This allows you to see the little details of the plant such as the buds, the little hairs attached etc. I made the focal length 55.0mm because I wanted to get an extreme close up shot of the plant. That day there was a fair amount of light so the ISO was set at 200. I am pretty glad with how the picture turned out.

Equipment & Settings

Camera - Canon EOS 1100D

Canon EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS II

Focal Length - 55.0 mm

Aperture - f/5.6

Shutter Speed - 1/400s

ISO - 200

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