Polaroid Spectra Pro

by Brett Johnson August. 03, 2020 103 views

Polaroid introduced the Spectra camera system in 1986. It was a completely new camera line, and there was a corresponding new film. The Spectra film (called 'Image' outside North America) differs from 600 integral films in that it has a different image format: the 600 film is a square, while the Spectra film is a rectangular 9.2 x 7.3 cm dimension. The Spectra film is otherwise the same as 600 films - the ISO speed, the development method and the process remain the same. The Spectra camera series also has lenses on average better than the 600-film range; Most models use arc-shaped focusing lenses that rotate along the outer lens element to provide accurate focus rather than focusing correctly on the body. The distance between the inner lens elements. Spectra cameras are thought to take better pictures than a conventional 600 Polaroid camera.

Over time, Polaroid has introduced many variants of the Spectra, but most include a 'Quintic' 125mm f/10 3-element plastic lens, self-timer, automatic exposure, and sonar autofocus; in many cases the addition or removal of user controls is the only distinguishing characteristic between models (eg the Spectra 2 has only exposure adjustment; Spectra 'E' only has AF, flash and lighten/darken controls and the original Spectra has these plus LCD display, self-timer and volume controls). The Spectra/Image series also has many optional accessories, such as close-up lenses, special effects filters and a "law enforcement" kit.

Spectra film came with 10 shots per pack. After 10 shots, the camera went into EOP (end of pack) mode. Spectra film is also known as 1200 or Image film in some markets, and there are high definition and grid-marked versions available, as with 600 film.

All Spectra models except the Macro SLRs and the ProCam feature 125mm lenses, giving a field of view equivalent to 46mm on a 35mm film camera.

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