Traveling Down Under- Day 2, Melbourne, The Old Treasury Building

by Camellia Staab November. 26, 2019 435 views

Along with the Parliament House, the Old Treasury Building is the representation of what Melbourne first looked like in the 1850's.

The building was designed by a young 19 year old architect named John James Clark who immigrated to Australia from Liverpool.

The structure was initially built to store the gold flooding into Melbourne from the gold fields in vaults that occupy the basement of the building, while the rooms in the upper floors were offices for the Governor, Premier, Treasurer and other important government officials.

Eventually, around 1877 or so, the official treasury building was moved and so this building became known as the Old Treasury.

Today, the building is a history museum displaying both permanent and temporary exhibits.

In April of 1852, the Catholic Archbishop of Melbourne, James Goold, was given permission to export from Rome 135 Old Master paintings. A few are displayed in this museum.

Bust of Bishop Goold (1859)

Bust of Bishop Goold (1859)

Work by  Spanish Baroque master.

Work by Spanish Baroque master.

Publication by the Remondini family based in Bassano del Grappa. At one time this printing workshop employed 1,800 people.

Publication by the Remondini family based in Bassano del Grappa. At one time this printing workshop employed 1,800 people.

Sisters of Mecy

Sisters of Mecy

   Cope ,mid 1840

Cope ,mid 1840

In 1869 "Welcome Stranger" nugget was discovered. It was the largest nugget found laying 3 cm below the surface. The nugget was taken to the bank at Dunolly, but it was so large that it had to be broken down on an anvil at a local blacksmith's before it could fit on the bank's scale. After smelting it yielded 2,302 ounces (~71kg) of solid gold. The public was so interested in large gold nuggets that replicas were often made. This is the replica of the nugget made from painted plaster of Paris.

A sampling of the temporary exhibit called 'Wayward Women" related to women who did not fit the stereotype of demure Victorian womanhood.

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Gone Fishing Without A Pole 1 year, 6 months ago

If only we could share that nugget (the real one)!  Just catching up with your trip after being away during the holiday. Nice image and great education

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Gone Fishing Without A Pole 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you. Hope you had a relaxing holiday smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 1 year, 6 months ago

Thanks for bringing us some Ozzie History. Very entertaining, and some great pictures too.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Antonio Gil 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
David Swatton 1 year, 6 months ago

The last two look like exhibits borrowed from Melbourne Gaol... that was a fascinating place to tour. Hope you got to see it.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to David Swatton 1 year, 6 months ago

Looks like I have another trip ahead of me, don't know how I missed the Gaol (looked it up), definitely looks like I place I would enjoy seeing. I saw the prison in Fremantle but it does not compare to the Gaol.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

WOW! Wonderful comprehensive photo essay on this fascinating museum. Love all the creative compositions. Excellent work!+1grinning+1

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you Jay. Are you still in California?

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Camellia Staab 1 year, 6 months ago

My pleasure!

I'm back home but going to Texas in the first week of December.

Happy Holidays!

grinning

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
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