Traveling Down Under- Day 1, Perth, Rottnest Island (part 1)

by Camellia Staab January. 03, 2020 365 views

As promised in the last post, we are going to go quokka hunting. But mind you, this island is so beautiful, especial as far its view is concerned that we are not only going meet the quokka but we are also going the get the grand tour of the area and become a little more familiar with the island and what it has to offer. After all you might land here sometime soon 🙂

Rottnest Island is a special place for Western Australians and a popular destination for interstate and international visitors. Mediterranean-style climate and the range of flora and fauna on this Island provides the backdrop to a special holiday experience.

It is believed that Rottnest Island was separated from the mainland 7,000 years ago. The sea level rose, cutting the Island off from the land mass, and it is now the largest in a chain of islands on the continental shelf opposite Perth. This island is formed of limestone rocks with a thin covering of sand. The limestone base of Rottnest Island has an effect on all life on the Island, including the types of plants which can grow on it, the species of animals which can feed upon the plants, and the extent to which humans can make use of the Island.

The Island has six major habitats: coastal, salt lakes, brackish swamps, woodlands, heath and settled areas. Salt lakes occupy ten per cent of the area of Rottnest Island. Many of them - including Lake Baghdad, Lake Vincent, Herschel Lake, Garden Lake, Government House Lake and Serpentine Lake - are permanent and have surrounding beaches. Other lakes such as Pink Lake, Lake Sirius, Lake Negri and the twin Pearse Lakes may dry out in summer. (source)

Rottnest Island's waters contain a number of shipwrecks - a legacy of the uncharted navigational voyages that occurred during the early exploration of the southwest coast of Australia. More than thirteen ships have been wrecked within the waters of Rottnest Island. These wrecks are protected under Commonwealth legislation, Historic Shipwrecks Act 1976, as well as State legislation, Maritime Archeology Act 1973. Plaques have been located next to the wrecks and are complemented by onshore plaques indicating their locations. (source)

The limestone coral reef surrounding Rottnest grew approximately 100,000 years ago when the sea level was thought to be at least three metres higher than the present day. This reef system is fed by the warm Leeuwin Current and provides a home to much of Rottnest's marine life, as well as presenting a significant hazard for shipping.(source)

The Island's first lighthouse was completed in 1851 and was constructed by Aboriginal prisoners, under the supervision of the Prison Superintendent. Half a century later it was replaced with a new, taller lighthouse on Wadjemup Hill; and a third was built in 1900 at Bathurst Point after the loss of 11 lives when the ship, the City of York, was wrecked in 1899. The Bathurst Point and Wadjemup Hill lighthouses remain today. The Wadjemup lighthouse is open to the public and tours are conducted daily. (source)

The earliest discovery of Rottnest Island by Europeans is credited to Dutch navigators during the 17th century in their search for a shorter route from the Cape of Good Hope to Batavia. The first Europeans to actually land on the Island are believed to have been Samuel Volkerson and his crew of the Dutch ship Waeckende Boey while searching for survivors of another Dutch ship the Vergulde Draek in 1658. William de Vlamingh, who in 1696 was the next recorded European visitor to Rottnest Island, gave the Island its name after the abundance of quokkas he saw, mistaking them for rats. (source)

And so that is a quokka. They roam the area freely and rather friendly.

More about quokka in the next post.

Let's move forward.

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There are 19 comments , add yours!
Buster Bruce 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Going back to your postings that I missed when I was in Florida. On these exquisite images I will look more than express! #6 scores for me. The yacht shots just make me want one grinning

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Buster Bruce 1 month, 2 weeks ago

The yachts stand out because of that gorgeous blue 😉

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Pete Fitzgetald 1 month, 2 weeks ago

#10WOW

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Pete Fitzgetald 1 month, 2 weeks ago

😁

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Fascinating series! great camera work!+1

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Jay Boggess 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Thanks again Jay smile

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Camellia Staab 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Always a pleasure, my dear~grinning+1

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Antonio Gil 1 month, 2 weeks ago

That blue is just awesome. Now I want to go there too. smile

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Russell Smith 1 month, 2 weeks ago

#6 so cool the way the salt air and wind has bent this tree. The water is stunning

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Russell Smith 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Nature truly at it's best smile

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Deep blue, bright red and quokka! You got it all and I'm glad you share these eyecandies.
#3 - 2 x red - yes, this was a good idea to take a picture!
#10 - please be honest, you cut this one out from the tourist information!
#19 - so funny, you caught them in the right moment. The water is so clear. BIGSIGH
#26-#28 - STANDBY - story telling in pictures. 
Love this set, it's so heartwarming to see Australia without fire.

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue 1 month, 2 weeks ago

It is very sad what is going in Australia right now. I am glad I had a chance to visit before all this fire although very unhappy to see the Koalas and Kangaroos as well as the people suffering. Everytime I come across these photos of Rottnest I keep thinking, how can the water be so perfectly blue and clear. I just wish it was closer so one could go visit more often.

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Bethany Plonski 1 month, 2 weeks ago

These are gorgeous! The color variations in the water are just unreal, and of course I can't wait to learn more about the quokkas. Australia has such unique wildlife. Thank you for sharing it with us!

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 month, 2 weeks ago

The color of the water is just astonishing. I clicked and I clicked because I just couldn't get enough.

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Sherry Hill 1 month, 2 weeks ago

and now i want a quokka...
but that water, i can't get over how blue and clear it is..

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Sherry Hill 1 month, 2 weeks ago

You and me both. Just amazed at the color and clarity. The photos here are just a handful of what I actually captured because I just couldn't  get enough.

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Björn Roose 1 month, 2 weeks ago

I had been wondering about that "Rottnest" already. So, a "rattenest" without any rats smile

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Björn Roose 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Wondering....if there are no cats there, how come there are no rats?

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Camellia Staab 1 month, 2 weeks ago

Maybe they are scared of quokkas ?

1 month, 2 weeks ago Edited
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