Agama, Agama

by Camellia Staab March. 28, 2020 575 views

No, I have not lost my mind (yet) nor am I creating my own language. Agama, agama is actually a real word. The word's origin is African and it means lizard.

But not just any lizard.

I have seen quite a few varieties of lizards, mostly in Florida.

Some really big ones.

Some not so big ones.

Some with curly tails.

Some with straight tails.

Some black ones.

Some brown ones.

And some with colorful dewlaps.

But I had not seen an Agama, agama until this year.

This non-native lizard was first found in Florida in 1976. These lizards come in a West African subspecies and an East African subspecies. And the ones I spotted in Stuart come from the West African subspecies.

The breeding males of this subspecies have brilliant orange heads, and an indigo blue or black body and legs. Their tail is bluish white at the base and has an orange middle area and black tail tip.

Females and young agamas are a yellow or earth color on their backs with some barring marks.

These creatures eat ants, grasshoppers, and beetles in their native Africa. In Florida they feed on ants, spiders, beetles, grasshoppers, crickets and katydids along with flowers, grass, dead leaves, and human food such as candy, bread crumbs, pieces of carrots.

Females reach sexual maturity when they are 14-18 months old, males are mature at 2 years. The African redhead lizard reproduces during the wet season although they can reproduce nearly year round in areas with consistent rainfall.

In Florida, African redhead lizards, also called African rainbow lizards, are seen in urban areas on rocks, walls, sidewalks, rooftops and on trees.

Agama, agama...Lizard, lizard.

(source)

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Piotr B 2 months, 1 week ago

Hi Camelia, 

Lovely pictures. Come to Nigeria, you will enjoy agamas all around you with curious males nodding constantly their curry coloured heads.

I added two more agama pics on my blog. Have a look and enjoy!

2 months, 1 week ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Piotr B 2 months, 1 week ago

Thanks I'll check it out.

2 months, 1 week ago Edited
Buster Bruce 3 months ago

Enjoyed these images. #12 looks like he stuck his head into a bowl of curry!

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Buster Bruce 3 months ago

Or some saffron smile

3 months ago Edited
Piotr B Replied to Buster Bruce 2 months, 1 week ago

They are so curious they stuck their heads everywhere. But try to catch one, no way. It is easier to chase an odd chameleon.

2 months, 1 week ago Edited
Antonio Gil 3 months ago

A beautiful creature, and your pictures make him justice. Love this post

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Antonio Gil 3 months ago

Thanks smile

3 months ago Edited
Tsao T-F 3 months ago

Wow, so beautiful series.

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Tsao T-F 3 months ago

😁 Thank you .

3 months ago Edited
David Robertson 3 months ago

Great discussion and story.  I am alway amazed at the number of non-natives that now call Florida  home.

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to David Robertson 3 months ago

One of these day,s I hope to be one of them as well smile

3 months ago Edited
Sherry Hill 3 months ago

I so love lizards n gecko like critters.. so colourful.. awesome shots..

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Sherry Hill 3 months ago

Thank you Sherry. They really are cool looking. I just wish they weren't so skirmish so I could get closer to them

3 months ago Edited
Guillermo Huerga Borrego 3 months ago

I love the lizard in photo 12, it is simply spectacular, my nephew would hallucinate with this report, he loves lizards.

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Guillermo Huerga Borrego 3 months ago

They are different indeed.

3 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess 3 months ago

Fascinating series! 
I was not aware of such a variety of lizards in Florida! 
Wow! eyes

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Jay Boggess 3 months ago

The joy of owning a camera...opens one's eyes smile

3 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Camellia Staab 3 months ago

Amen & Amen......

And, the ability to share the things we find delightful, amazing and unique, for the pleasure & education of our kindred souls....

smile

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Jay Boggess 3 months ago

😁 👍🏼

3 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Camellia Staab 3 months ago

+1 heart decorationgrinning blue heart+1

3 months ago Edited
Richard Manning 3 months ago

That is really beautiful animal. Sometimes you see that colorful variation in birds. I wouldn't expect that in a lizard.  Thanks for sharing.

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Richard Manning 3 months ago

Thank you Richard. So much uniqueness out there, the camera has helped me see a lot better smile

3 months ago Edited
Lynn F Medley 3 months ago

Great shots! They can move sooo fast,,

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Lynn F Medley 3 months ago

Yes and they must have eyes behind, on the side on the tail because no matter how slowly and quietly I moved....they knew I was there and would run and hide.

3 months ago Edited
Don Baird 3 months ago

We have a lot of them here in The Villages. I've never seen one like #12 though.

3 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab Replied to Don Baird 3 months ago

Apparently they are found more in the southern part. Someone must have brought them from Africa and let them loose at one time. Almost like the Iguanas that are found in Fort Lauderdale .

3 months ago Edited
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