Inner Mongolia, Day 2

by Caroline Killmer August. 15, 2009 1623 views

We visited a school to drop of school supplies, then went to fly kites in the grasslands. The evening ended with a banquet, including lots of song and dance and a lucky draw that bequeathed everyone with at least one prize (I got tickets to a park in west Beijing).

Thoughtfully, the school to which supplies were brought asked a bunch of students to come in on a Saturday to parade around in tiny uniforms.

They lined them up, and then marched them over to the front of the school to raise the flag and stand in rank until they got fidgety and one child passed out from standing still in the sun.

Textbooks, notebooks, athletic gear.

Scepter-bearer.

A yawn escapes.

Good times, good times.

Even some of the gift-givers got a bit antsy and went to play in the shade.

Saluting the flag through a stuck shutter.

I know what I'm looking at. What are you looking at?

The school was renovated recently, so all in all it looked like they weren't doing too badly.

Getting the giggles.

I like that one of the flag-bearers totally lost interest. Fortunately no one reprimanded him.

Suave.

Well, I always do.

No really, this is a sign in the school reminding kids not to speak any sort of Mongolian-Mandarin hybrid, or even just their native tongue. I guess it helps that they say please?

Classroom.

And out to the grasslands!

Our first day there was extremely windy.

The second day, not so much.

More grasslands. If you look very, very carefully, you can see some windmills out thar.

More fun with cheesy double-exposures.

No, the wind did not pick up. This kite is being pulled by a car.

It's easier for sheep and goats to see humans if they tip their heads sideways. Something about their weirdly-shaped pupils. It's true! You can look it up.

Random.

Hobbled horse.

When the sky is overcast, Mr. Owl becomes hyper-vigilant. We considered trying to set him free but getting the chain off his leg probably would have resulted in lots of damage done to humans. That, and I think he's been captive too long - I'm not sure he could hunt.

Post-meal drunken chatting and handshaking. I wonder how many deals are done over baijiu (excruciating Chinese whiskey) that are then forgotten due to brain cell death?

Dining, performances, bored waitress.

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