OOOUCH DOC!!! - "Covid Testing Gone Wrong!"

by Ron Morales October. 04, 2020 1280 views
Doctor applies nasal check for covid-19 at drive up testing center. Photo: News Medical

Doctor applies nasal check for covid-19 at drive up testing center. Photo: News Medical

Written by Michelle Botello

A woman in her 40s who was recently diagnosed with a rare condition which required nasal surgery took the covid swab test and had a horrible experience. The FDA introduced another way to test for the SARS-CoV2.

Apparently, she had been treated for intracranial hypertension, a chronic disease related to the spinal fluid being too high.  Her fluid was drained.  During this time, the brain’s lining pushed into the nose where the swab rubbed.  It seems that the rub had been pointed up instead of taking the swab through the path of the nose causing fluid to ooze out of one nostril.

Jarrett Walsh, senior author of the paper that appeared in JAMA otolaryngology-head & neck surgery warned that it would be in the best interest to follow protocol when giving a test.  In other words, her swab rub may not have been done properly.

Doctor illustrates correct nasal application for covid-19. Photo: Infobioquimica.org

Doctor illustrates correct nasal application for covid-19. Photo: Infobioquimica.org

The covid swab test, also called the nasopharyngeal swab, gathers fluids from the upper part of the throat, behind the nose.The dab is between the nose and mouth, in the back of your throat, swabbed for 15 seconds while rotating.

It looks like a long q-tip and it goes in and twirls, then comes out, puts into a vial, and is sent to the lab.  A tik tok user said it was like being stabbed in the brain. Respiratory viruses sample in the back of the nose which is why the test is done with a swab in the nose.  It is important to reach this area with the six-inch swab.

If you only agree with the swab test, it may be because you haven’t been informed about the saliva test, which, Yale researcher,  Anne Wyllie, associate research scientist in epidemiology, recommends getting tested twice a week or more.

Admiral Brett P. Groir, M.D. explaining the difference in procedures. Photo: IonGreeville

Admiral Brett P. Groir, M.D. explaining the difference in procedures. Photo: IonGreeville

Wyllie describes the oral test as being less expensive, and less invasive.  Also, this test gives quicker results. The Yale oral test gets lower sensitivity in patients with lower levels of the virus.  It is 90 percent sensitive in patients and 88 to 90 percent in healthy people. This test is being worked on to be able to serve below a 24-hour  service.

Assistant Secretary for Health and COVID-19 Testing Coordinator Admiral Brett P. Groir, M.D. said that the saliva test is a game changer as a new testing innovation. The saliva test takes the place of any swab testing and its discomfort.  The FDA declared that Yale’s saliva test meets requirements for emergency authorization to test for SARS-CoV2, the virus.  

Wrcb.com:  Like Being Stabbed in the Brain

UCDavis.edu:  Coronavirus (Covid-19) testing:What You Should Know

Cnbc.com:  Yale Researcher Says…

Fda.gov: Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update: FDA Issues Emergency Use Authorization to Yale...

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