Peeking Through

by Chossid July. 08, 2012 8273 views

In order to understand this post, you really need to first view the previous one…


However…. this is the “chazan,” who is leading the prayers. In front of him is the “aron kodesh” – the holy ark, which houses the Torah scrolls.

This is probably someone important, possibly the head of the yeshiva.

This is my husband…. He is putting on his talis or prayer shawl here.

What are Tzitzis and Talis?

“Speak to the children of Israel and say to them: They shall make for themselves fringes on the corners of their garments… And this shall be tzitzis for you, and when you see it, you will remember all the commandments of G-d, and perform them” (Numbers 15:38-39).

Most people don't think of Judaism as a fringe religion. Yet that's our uniform and badge of honor, our everyday reminder of who we are and what we're here for—four tassels hanging from the fringes of our clothes.

In ancient times, we would hang the tassels from the fringes of the four-cornered cloaks that were part of people's everyday wardrobe. Today, Jewish men and boys have two ways to do this mitzvah every day:

a) During prayer, wrap yourself in a talis gadol (literally: big cloak). This is the large sheet-like fringed prayer shawl worn during the morning prayers.

b) Wear a little poncho called a talis katan (literally: small cloak). For most of us, it fits neatly under the shirt.

The fringe tassels themselves are called tzitzis. Their strings and knots are a physical representation of the Torah's 613 do's and don'ts. It works like this: Each letter in the Hebrew alphabet has a corresponding numerical value. The numerical values of the five letters that comprise the Hebrew word tzitzit add up to 600. Add the eight strings and five knots of each tassel, and the total is 613.

Wearing tzitzis is a sign of Jewish pride. Jews have always had a way of dress to distinguish them from the people of the lands in which they lived—even when that meant exposing themselves to danger and bigotry. By the grace of G‑d, today most of us live in lands where we are free to practice our religion without such fears. Today we wear our Jewish uniform with pride and with our heads held high.

Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism based on the deepest levels of the Torah,) teaches that the talis garment is a metaphor for G‑d's infinite transcendent light. The fringes allude to the immanent divine light which permeates every element of creation. By wearing a talis gadol or a talis katan, a Jew synthesizes these two elements and makes them real in his life.

About to don Tefillin (phylacteries)…

Here is an excellent explanation of what this is all about [chabad.org]

Putting on the arm tefillin…

…and the head Tefillin…

Immersed in prayer

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There are 18 comments , add yours!
Olga Helys 8 years, 9 months ago

Interesting, great report
Great angles, colors, actions:)
Thanks

8 years, 9 months ago Edited
Masoud Ahmadpoor 8 years, 9 months ago

pray for me!
Impressive :)

8 years, 9 months ago Edited
Dannii L 8 years, 9 months ago

Great shots and interesting description

8 years, 9 months ago Edited
Carrie 8 years, 9 months ago

Very interesting shots!!

8 years, 9 months ago Edited
Mehdi Zahirnia 8 years, 10 months ago

Very nice set...ingenious idea:)

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Eiram Marie 8 years, 10 months ago

Leah, do only boys and men wear them? Is there a reason why not the women?
LOL I am sure there is:)

Fascinating post and great shots!

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Jacki 8 years, 10 months ago

More very interesting information!

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Marsha 8 years, 10 months ago

Such interesting customs....thanks for sharing! Love the "pose" you caught in #3!

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Sadhya Rippon 8 years, 10 months ago

Again, so fascinating. Thanks for sharing these beautiful shots and for your explanations.

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Gillian Parsons 8 years, 10 months ago

Enlightening.........................

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 8 years, 10 months ago

The key hole feature allows us to focus our attention on the details, which is the main aspect here. You should make a compilation of these learning posts about judaism and publish them.

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Mallusatish Reddy 8 years, 10 months ago

very nice post~!~

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Rob Gant 8 years, 10 months ago

These is aa awesome set love #4

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Eric J H Joyce 8 years, 10 months ago

these are some great shots.

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Mike Meliska 8 years, 10 months ago

Very informative post....

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Finbarr 8 years, 10 months ago

Superb post !!

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Becky Brannon 8 years, 10 months ago

I love the keyhole view, it helps me feel I am viewing something special.

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
Dan Ravasio 8 years, 10 months ago

awesome....... totally dramatic......#3 to my faves - the good Rabbi!

8 years, 10 months ago Edited
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