Where I Live

  • Posted April 21, 2008 by Dadlak in Buildings. Viewed 520 times

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Busted flat in Baton Rouge
Waiting for a train
I was feelin' just as faded as my jeans
Bobby thumbed a diesel down
Just before it rained
Took us all the way to New Orleans


Me and Bobby McGee, Kris Kristofferson (popularized by Janis Joplin)

A city of about 400,000 people, my 20-year hometown of Baton Rouge is the capital of Louisiana and the home of Louisiana State University. My apologies for reposting many of these photos, but this theme gives me a chance to pull them all together.

The levee spells out the name of Baton Rouge, which is better seen from the bridge or across the river (or almost not at all with the river at present levels).

Capitol Grocery is a landmark in Spanish Town, a downtown neighborhood.

The new Shaw Center is a cultural magnet, both inside and out.

The “new” State Capitol (built in the 1930s) is the city's most recognizable and most phallic building.

Or maybe the former title goes to Tiger Stadium

Where the 2007 NCAA football champs play before 90,000-plus per game

Long in restoration, the Old State Capitol is now a showplace.

Six flags have flown over the city.

The Unitarian Church of Baton Rouge, where I'm a member, features a beautiful circle window.

My backyard features this pond, thanks to the good work of the previous owner.

Airline Highway is a major thoroughfare through town. It took awhile, but I figured out the apparently contradictory U-turn signs.

Founded by Baton Rougean Todd Graves, Raising Cane's (named after the owner's dog) serves a one-item menu of chicken fingers. If you want a catfish plate, Sherwood Po Boy thinks they are the place to go.

The Reilly Theatre (named after the primary benefactor) at Swine Palace (named after the building's previous use as a livestock show arena) features cutting-edge dramas.

This is the Amite River in Port Vincent, LA–about 30 minutes from Baton Rouge.

The USS Kidd (named after the famous pirate), a WWII destroyer, serves as a naval museum.

As in most of Louisiana, Mardi Gras is big in Baton Rouge. Here's the procession of the King and Queen at the Desk and Derrick Mardi Gras ball.

Parades pepper the Mardi Gras season–even for canines.

Sports are everywhere in Baton Rouge, from Tiger Stadium to the baseball field at Episcopal High.

The Pentagon Barracks are a holdover from the days when LSU was a military school downtown.

Hedge maze on the State Capitol grounds

View from the roof of the Shaw Center, where the happy hour set gathers to drink and eat sushi.

Looking south toward the “new” (circa 1970) Mississippi River bridge. The new planetarium, the Louisiana Arts and Science Museum, the city dock, the USS Kidd and the Belle of Baton Rouge casino are all visible along or in the water. The old water tower is in the foreground.

Baton Rougeans parade for St. Patrick's Day as well as Mardi Gras. “Throw me something, mister!” is the cry from the crowd–even to the ladies on the floats.

Where I work and bank (although I don't work for the bank) at 451 Florida Street

Looking south across recently-dredged Capitol Lake toward the State Capitol

At least five modes of transportation (truck, car, ship, railroad track, foot) are visible near the Mississippi River.

Downtown festivals find Baton Rouge at its best, as the whole community gathers. Here Marva Wright sings on Earth Day 2008.

High water on the Mississippi. That's the “old” Mississippi River bridge–it combines a railroad bridge and car bridge–fortunately I've never had to share it with a train…we mostly cross the “new” bridge. Before the bridges were built, all river crossings were done by ferry. Several ferries still operate along the Mississippi within 50 miles of Baton Rouge.

Sitting in traffic on I-10 makes you feel like one of us. Objects aren't quite as close in real life as they appear in this cropped shot.

Sago palms are everywhere in Baton Rouge hiding otherwise blank spaces. Don't try to run through them–the fronds are very sharp.

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    • # Joseph

      nice shots .its always nice to see other photos from other cities that way I learn more about them .thanks for sharing

      2008.04.22 Edited Reply Cancel

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