DC Trip - National Gallery of Art (East)

by Kevin November. 10, 2009 5514 views

The East Building, designed by I.M. Pei, focuses on modern and contemporary art, with a collection including works by Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Jackson Pollock, Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Alexander Calder.

Photos are from Day 4 [photoblog.com].

Picasso's Harlequin Musician.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Jean Dubuffet's Façades d'immeubles (Building Façades), 1946

Seeking directness and authenticity, Dubuffet deliberately modeled his art after that of children. He created the animated, crudely drawn stick figures of this postwar apartment complex by scratching through black paint to reveal hidden, delicate colors beneath.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

This Matisse (La Coiffure) reminded us of a painting of our friend Ariane back in 2005. Click here to see the painting of Ariane. [photoblog.com]

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Pablo Picasso, Le Gourmet, 1901.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Pablo Picasso, Family of Saltimbanques, 1905

Picasso may be the harlequin figure (far left) in this image of an itinerant circus troupe that often performed near his bohemian neighborhood of Montmartre in Paris. Young and poor himself, Picasso identified with these street artists. Their stark backdrop and
disconnected gazes underscore the loneliness and marginality that the artist keenly felt.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

I forget who painted this, but I remember it from the cover of a school book.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Andy Warhol, Green Marilyn, 1962.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Mel Bochner, Theory of Boundaries, 1969-1970.

If “at/in” describes the hard-edged square at left, then “over/in” must refer to the seepage of pigment over the edges, and so on. Bochner slyly reveals the “mechanism” of his work’s creation by inscribing a word fraction on each square, perhaps to teach us a different way of thinking about the artist’s process.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Fred Sandback, Untitled (Gray Corner Construction), 1968.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Alexander Calder mobiles.

The meaning of the term “mobile” as applied to sculpture has evolved since it was first suggested by Marcel Duchamp in 1931 to describe the early, mechanized creations of Alexander Calder.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Calder in many respects invented an art form where objects (typically brightly coloured, abstract shapes fashioned from sheet metal) are connected by wire much like a balance scale.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

Stephanie contemplating Calder's works.

Photo taken 10/22/09.

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