My Weird & Wonderful World of Moths. Antler Moth-Cerapteryx graminis

by Steve Hawkeye December. 07, 2020 107 views
Antler Moth-Cerapteryx graminis
Norfolk status
Heathland, grassland, fens and scrub and other open areas. Comes to light at night and occasionally seen flying by day.
Forewing:	12-17mm.
Flight:	One generation July-Sept.
Foodplant:  	Grasses, sedges and rushes
Nat Status:	Common

Antler Moth-Cerapteryx graminis Norfolk status Heathland, grassland, fens and scrub and other open areas. Comes to light at night and occasionally seen flying by day. Forewing: 12-17mm. Flight: One generation July-Sept. Foodplant: Grasses, sedges and rushes Nat Status: Common

This distinctively marked moth is common over much Norfolk. However, not a common visitor to my MV Light trap on my wildlife meadow in Norfolk, UK. Generally found on grasses, sedges and rushes The larvae feed on various types of grasses, sometimes abundantly, the species is well-known for its ability to destroy large tracts of grassland. The adults fly from June to September and fly during the day as well as at night when they come to light.

My Weird & Wonderful World of Moths

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