Composing a Shot

by Hannah Thomson October. 29, 2017 256 views

As photographers, how can we direct our audience's attention to a certain aspect of our images? We want to create visual appealing and attractive shots presented in a convincing way to encourage the viewer to realise the emphasis of our images. This week, I learnt that their was a variety of techniques I could use to achieve this.

Symmetry

Symmetry

Symmetrical shots are usually very appealing to the eye as it uses the complimentary division of space equally which balances the image. In these shots particularly, the focus is on the central beam which then spreads out either side symmetrically in a parallel which gives the illusion the bars would carry on spreading forever just from this small composition.

Symmetry

Symmetry

Even the smallest of objects can balance out an image and make it more appealing to the eye.

Rule of Thirds

Rule of Thirds

Rule of Thirds is a technique I personally think works so well. It allows for the subject to be off centre without disturbing the balance of the photo. It gives the images so much more depth and meaning and can be used to tell and push a story out to the audience even further.

Leading Lines

Leading Lines

Leading Lines can be used in an image in so many different ways. Whether it's to direct an audience's attention through the image or to emphasise an object in a shot, our eyes are naturally drawn to lines in images. Photographers can manipulate this and use leading lines to communicate direction. Visually appealing and very useful to create dynamic shots, you can see why it is a popular technique to use.

Golden Spiral

Golden Spiral

A golden spiral is a naturally occurring phenomena and an effect that we are extremely receptive to subconsciously. A tool to orient the audience's attention, it is a very powerful composition tool. Spiralling the audience's focus on to a specific part of the object in the image, in this case, the eyes, it naturally allows the photographer to achieve the desired outcome without extremely altering the photo.

Balancing Elements

Balancing Elements

Balancing Elements

Balancing Elements

Quite simply, this technique ensures that an image isn't offset with a massive object on one side of the shot and nothing on the other. I feel like this technique is not necessary in everyday photography as these shots could have worked by applying the Rule of Thirds. However, for larger scale photography, such as architecture and long distance shots, this could come in handy.

Through applying all 5 techniques to my photography this week, I feel like I have a deeper understanding of audience manipulation and, more importantly, how to direct a viewer's attention to where you want it. Throughout the next few weeks I am definitely going to be applying these styles to my work and hopefully improve on my photography even further.

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