Kookies

by John Wilson February. 17, 2019 380 views

A population of local kookaburras visits our back yard daily, hunting for worms and insects. They're remarkably sociable and will let you get very close with a camera.

Kookaburras are the world's largest kingfishers. Although `fisher' is a bit misleading - they are bush dwellers hunting lizards, snakes, rodents... and meat from the bbq when you're not paying attention.

Kookaburras are the world's largest kingfishers. Although `fisher' is a bit misleading - they are bush dwellers hunting lizards, snakes, rodents... and meat from the bbq when you're not paying attention.

It's intriguing how they relate to humans. Unlike most other local birds they are often prepared to engage with you and certainly pick up very quickly that you are not a threat.But keep their eyes on you, just in case.

It's intriguing how they relate to humans. Unlike most other local birds they are often prepared to engage with you and certainly pick up very quickly that you are not a threat.But keep their eyes on you, just in case.

They very happily swoop down to the house and have a little chat.I'm not very fluent in kookaburra but if I imitate their various sounds they do stop and listen. Their so-called `laugh' is well known, actually a territorial thing, but they make lots of other quieter calls to each other.

They very happily swoop down to the house and have a little chat.I'm not very fluent in kookaburra but if I imitate their various sounds they do stop and listen. Their so-called `laugh' is well known, actually a territorial thing, but they make lots of other quieter calls to each other.

I think they're quite good looking, in a prehistoric kind of way.

I think they're quite good looking, in a prehistoric kind of way.

Yes, you. And the one behind you, bottom left. They're fairly common in bushland areas even around the major population centres in eastern Australia so you can take them for granted, but I find them fascinating.

Yes, you. And the one behind you, bottom left. They're fairly common in bushland areas even around the major population centres in eastern Australia so you can take them for granted, but I find them fascinating.

They give you a bit of a quizzical look the closer you get but will only fly away if you make a sudden movement. You can see me reflected in its eyeball by the way.

They give you a bit of a quizzical look the closer you get but will only fly away if you make a sudden movement. You can see me reflected in its eyeball by the way.

Although they sit on our fence or come into the yard, their preferred positions are to the rear, sitting on branches and watching for any tasty morsels scuttling below.Their eyesight is incredible - they pick out an insect in my garden or lawn from long distances.

Although they sit on our fence or come into the yard, their preferred positions are to the rear, sitting on branches and watching for any tasty morsels scuttling below.Their eyesight is incredible - they pick out an insect in my garden or lawn from long distances.

As you can tell, I'm very fond of my local kookies.

As you can tell, I'm very fond of my local kookies.

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Heike 8 months, 3 weeks ago

You really captured the beauty of this bird, John. Great photos of your neighbours!

8 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Heike 8 months, 3 weeks ago

Thank you Heike! They have personalities, just not entirely sure what they're thinking!

8 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Björn Roose 8 months, 3 weeks ago

Nice birds. And good shots of them smile

8 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Björn Roose 8 months, 3 weeks ago

Thanks! They're my friends so I'll pass on your kind words to them!

8 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
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