Regeneration

by John Wilson January. 15, 2020 205 views

Over winter, the local fire services burnt the bushland behind my home to mitigate against possible larger fires in the summer. It's now regenerating before our eyes.

This poor eucalyptus tree has taken a double whammy. The fire service burnoff singed it significantly, then a mini cyclone a few months later snapped the tree in half. But here it is, ever hopeful, sprouting again. I love that about the Australian bush. Never give up.

This poor eucalyptus tree has taken a double whammy. The fire service burnoff singed it significantly, then a mini cyclone a few months later snapped the tree in half. But here it is, ever hopeful, sprouting again. I love that about the Australian bush. Never give up.

New growth is everywhere, sprouting from charred trees.

New growth is everywhere, sprouting from charred trees.

Acacia seeds have opened and new trees will sprout soon.

Acacia seeds have opened and new trees will sprout soon.

This flowering eucalypt is endemic to our area. They are furiously flowering since the burnoff.

This flowering eucalypt is endemic to our area. They are furiously flowering since the burnoff.

Its flowers are some of my absolute favourites. I haven't been able to track down the name of this particular species but will keep trying. There are dozens of them behind my house.

Its flowers are some of my absolute favourites. I haven't been able to track down the name of this particular species but will keep trying. There are dozens of them behind my house.

Grass trees have sprung to life since the burnoff. Fire is a part of the lifecycle of many Australian plants. Sadly, the recent ferocious bushfires across our state have been so extreme that I'm not convinced everything will come back quite in this way. I sincerely hope I'm wrong.

Grass trees have sprung to life since the burnoff. Fire is a part of the lifecycle of many Australian plants. Sadly, the recent ferocious bushfires across our state have been so extreme that I'm not convinced everything will come back quite in this way. I sincerely hope I'm wrong.

Grass trees throw out a spectacular flower spike we call a `kangaroo tail' for obvious reasons. Sorry, didn't quite get this one in focus but you get the idea.

Grass trees throw out a spectacular flower spike we call a `kangaroo tail' for obvious reasons. Sorry, didn't quite get this one in focus but you get the idea.

A lorikeet feeding on local banksia flowers. Lorikeets are so plentiful across Australia that it's easy to take them for granted, but they are very pretty little parrots. And they fly incredibly fast! A flash of colour past your eyes that's so quick you think might have imagined it.

A lorikeet feeding on local banksia flowers. Lorikeets are so plentiful across Australia that it's easy to take them for granted, but they are very pretty little parrots. And they fly incredibly fast! A flash of colour past your eyes that's so quick you think might have imagined it.

Left a feather behind in its haste.

Left a feather behind in its haste.

The angophoras shed their bark at this time of year, meaning the bush is now a spectacular array of orange, green and black (from the burnoff).

The angophoras shed their bark at this time of year, meaning the bush is now a spectacular array of orange, green and black (from the burnoff).

New life springing from a hole in a rock.

New life springing from a hole in a rock.

This cockatoo had been hiding in the tree hollow, but they're so inquisitive he couldn't stay concealed for long.

This cockatoo had been hiding in the tree hollow, but they're so inquisitive he couldn't stay concealed for long.

And who's this hiding in the termite nest?

And who's this hiding in the termite nest?

Ahh, mother kookaburra feeding gives a clue.

Ahh, mother kookaburra feeding gives a clue.

Baby kookie! Time to leave the nest Junior, you're much too big to stay in there.

Baby kookie! Time to leave the nest Junior, you're much too big to stay in there.

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Bethany Plonski 1 month ago

Thank you for sharing this! I lived near a place that had an especially destructive wildfire and remember reading about how long it would take for the vegetation to recover - with more severe burns it's staggering! Love that you captured things coming back to life in such a detailed and informative way here.

1 month ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 month ago

Thanks Bethany! At my place the fire was a controlled burnoff but it's been totally out of control across the country. But good news, rain in many places today!

1 month ago Edited
Benny Law 1 month ago

Exceptional post. Thoroughly enjoyed it. Hope nature can do its magic again after the wildfires have died down.

1 month ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Benny Law 1 month ago

Thanks Benny! Yes, the current fires have been very destructive, let's hope there's regeneration in those areas too.

1 month ago Edited
Heike 1 month ago

Good to see a post from you, John. We get regulary reports about the bushfires here and are deeply saddened. Good to see some photos of Australia's nature that look a bit different, than that ones that are shown in the daily news. Hopefully, people, animals  and nature will recover quickly from this terrible disaster...

1 month ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Heike 1 month ago

Thanks Heike! So far the fires have kept away from the big cities but they have badly affected many rural communities. It's hard to explain how big the fires have been - there are many, many fires and some are larger than entire countries. And they're still burning right now. There will certainly be recovery and regeneration but the scale is unlike anything I've known, so it remains to be seen what the permanent impacts will be. We can only hope.

1 month ago Edited
Margarida Duarte 1 month ago

Muito bom!+1

1 month ago Edited
John Wilson Replied to Margarida Duarte 1 month ago

Muito obrigado!

1 month ago Edited
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