Macro Monday (105/365)

by Lee Santiva April. 15, 2019 279 views
Parts of the transmission for a model truck

Parts of the transmission for a model truck

In yesterday's blog I described my husband's hobby which is to build fully functional models of the Mercedes Benz Unimog truck series in 1:12 scale which can be driven by remote control.

Today's blog provides some details about the transmission, suspension and the chassis.

Photo #1 shows some of the parts required for a 3-gear transmission. My husband milled the hollow housing with the unusual openings in photo #1 from one solid piece of brass. The one cent piece provides some perspective to the size.

He purchases the gear wheels and adapts them so there isn't too much "play" when the gear teeth connect. But first he spends several hours calculating to get the right gear ratio. He explained the gearwheels together must equal 40 however the pairs needs to be something like this.: 10-30, 20-20 and 28-12 for example.

In photo #1 you see the largest gearwheel with 30 teeth and the smallest with 10 teeth.

Macro calculations for the transmission

Macro calculations for the transmission

Photo #3 showcases the various component parts in the suspension. You might enjoy to watch this video, at timestamp 1:25 you can view this unique suspension in action. Already at this stage, the chassis of the model truck can move in the same way in which one side of the truck can drive over a large obstacle while the entire truck stays upright. That is because of the unique "portal" axle and suspension system of the original Unimog trucks which this model replicates.

Wheel and suspension assembly of the model truck

Wheel and suspension assembly of the model truck

Only the shock absorbers (spring) and rubber tires were purchased. My husband designed and created all of the other components in brass and aluminium by individually milling and drilling them. He showed me how he needed to drill 6 holes each one millimeter in dimension in a precise distance to each other in order to attach the rim to the suspension sub-assembly for each wheel. When parts aren't attached with screws, he will solder them to fuse them together.

Chassis and tanks of the model truck

Chassis and tanks of the model truck

Photo #4 showcases some of the more advanced milling techniques used to create non-linear pieces out of metal such as the curves of the chassis frame (which is one single piece of brass per side) as well as the tanks which were made out of aluminium. The tiny holes in the chassis are one millimeter in diameter.

Only at this stage of model construction can you see the details. Once it is painted black and the rest of the truck is placed on top all of these incredible details will be hidden from view.

Now after reading these 2 blogs, you might think my husband has a degree in mechanical engineering, or experience in the automotive industry or works industrial design. But, that's not the case.

I believe he has a natural talent for all things mechanical and of course he has a passion for building functional Unimog truckmodels.

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There are 11 comments , add yours!
Camellia Staab 1 year, 6 months ago

The photos are fantastic and the detailed narrative quite interesting. Your husband is definitely one talented man!

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Camellia Staab 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you again, and also on his behalf, he is also very appreciative of the praise for his hard work.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bob Rosenberg 1 year, 6 months ago

What an amazing feat your guy has done - super talent.  It's a pretty tiny percentage of folks who could possibly undertake this.  I'm in awe.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Bob Rosenberg 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you and I thank you on his behalf. There aren't too many people who can recognize what it takes to make these models so your appreciation was especially valuable to him.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Russell Smith 1 year, 6 months ago

Beautiful detail and craftsmanship .

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Russell Smith 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you!!

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lynn F Medley 1 year, 6 months ago

Amazing photos of what is an amazing project! Wow that your husband has this talents! Thanks for sharing 😊

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Lynn F Medley 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you Lynn and also on behalf of my husband. These 2 blogs were a nice way for us to bring our hobbies together smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Berckmans Peter 1 year, 6 months ago

I take my hat of to your husband. He is a craftsman. Love to see this kind of stuff. I have driven an Unimog when I was in the army,they are powerhouses in the field. And for your pics,love them

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Berckmans Peter 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you Peter and my husband very much appreciates your recognition and praise as well. It's cool that you actually know and have driven a Unimog as they are very unique.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Björn Roose 1 year, 6 months ago

That cent does indeed do the trick for putting things "into perspective" smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
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