Churches and places of Worship

by Mike Dickinson February. 28, 2021 152 views

Whatever faith many people follow you can guarantee many of them will do so in an architectural building of splendour. Such buildings are rarely built with the same kind of opulence these days, perhaps with the exception of Mosques. Photos of which I have yet to capture but intend to do so.

These buildings carry so much history; not just in the memories of Christenings, Weddings and Funerals, or, 'Hatches, Matches and despatches', as some colloquially call them, but also in their design and fabric. When ancient buildings like these require restoration or repairs, generally due to damage caused by the elements on the outside or Woodworm and dry rot on the inside, finding the skilled crafts people to carry out the work is becoming more difficult with each passing decade.

This is why I love to capture photos of these amazing buildings. One sure way of preserving their identity in perpetuity. There was a time when access to the inside of Churches was straight forward as many of them always had an open door policy. Nowadays, sadly, due to theft and vandalism, most church buildings are kept securely locked. It's a sad indictment that one of the comedian's standing jokes was often at the the expense of a church roof having its lead stripped off by thieves.

Here I have had the good fortune and the assistance of some very helpful church staff, to capture inside as well as the outside of some beautiful buildings that were built to Glorify the God they worshipped. I hope I have managed to capture the essence of the solitude and serenity of these magnificent buildings. The like of which we're unlikely to ever see built again and are gradually but most certainly living on borrowed time.

This is inside St Mary Magdalene Parish Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England. Further information may be found at the following link: https://stmarysclitheroe.co.uk/st-mary-magdalene-clitheroe/

This is inside St Mary Magdalene Parish Church, Clitheroe, Lancashire, England. Further information may be found at the following link: https://stmarysclitheroe.co.uk/st-mary-magdalene-clitheroe/

This is Blackburn Cathedral. A beautiful building inside and out.  You can find more information on its history at the following link: https://blackburncathedral.com/education/history/

This is Blackburn Cathedral. A beautiful building inside and out. You can find more information on its history at the following link: https://blackburncathedral.com/education/history/

St Michael the Archangel, Kirkby, Malham, Yorkshire, England. Further information may be found at the following link: https://www.kirkbymalhamchurch.org/our-history/

St Michael the Archangel, Kirkby, Malham, Yorkshire, England. Further information may be found at the following link: https://www.kirkbymalhamchurch.org/our-history/

St Marys and all Saints Church, Whalley, Lancashire. Steeped i History, Further information about this church may be found here:

St Marys and all Saints Church, Whalley, Lancashire. Steeped i History, Further information about this church may be found here:

Looking more like a Mosque, this is Giggleswick School Chapel, North Yorkshire.

Looking more like a Mosque, this is Giggleswick School Chapel, North Yorkshire.

A revisit to the Beautiful village of Whalley saw me inside the local Parish church, St Mary & All Saints. Little has changed since my last visit and I'm happy to say, it remains a lovely tranquil place of peace.

Capturing the Stained Glass window in correct exposure required three bracketed shots.

Capturing the Stained Glass window in correct exposure required three bracketed shots.

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There are 9 comments , add yours!
Helen Anders 3 months, 1 week ago

What magnificent churches, inside and out! I’m sure attendance has fallen off in your part of the world, too, which can lead to them falling into disrepair with limited funding. I will check out your “onion” church!  Thanks for sharing these and you have definitely captured their essence.

3 months, 1 week ago Edited
Mike Dickinson Replied to Helen Anders 3 months, 1 week ago

Thank you, Helen. Hoping not too distant future will see the re-opening of some of the places that have been closed during the Covid Lockdown. And of course, warmer weather!

3 months, 1 week ago Edited
Michelle Thompson 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Hi Mike, I love your photo's of Churches. Cathedrals are on my list next blush

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Mike Dickinson Replied to Michelle Thompson 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Thank you, Michelle. I would love to visit Lincoln Cathedral. The city  itself is steeped in History and architecture.

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Michelle Thompson Replied to Mike Dickinson 3 months, 3 weeks ago

I would also Mike grinning

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Bob Chappell 3 months, 3 weeks ago

You'd love Ely Cathedral, if you get the chance have a walk round the entire outside as well as the inside.

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Mike Dickinson Replied to Bob Chappell 3 months, 3 weeks ago

I'm sure I would Bob. Only for the three and a half hour journey from where I live! I think the next one on my bucket list is Lincoln. Not quite as far to travel and heaped in history.

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Craig Casterline 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Wonderful shots. They certainly give a feel for the buildings. I also appreciate the commentary though it does highlight a sad aspect of modern society. These old churches certainly are works of art.

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Mike Dickinson Replied to Craig Casterline 3 months, 3 weeks ago

Thank you, Craig. Yes, it is a shame that such buildings are in a sad decline and most unlikely to be built in the future. Many of the ancient church buildings we see today were funded by munificent philanthropists. Many of them were wealthy employers, particularly in the Cotton industry. And some of the Employers insisted in their workers attending church on Sundays and asked why on Monday morning if they didn't. Such funding isn't there nowadays, which is why many of them, much against some of their stalwart congregations, chose to amalgamate with other churches. Churches built today and they are extremely few and far between, do not have the artistic design or expense spent on them as they did in the 17th Century.

3 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
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