Sandpipers

by Robin Fuller April. 28, 2020 250 views

Sandpipers are wading birds, mainly of seashores, estuaries and other wetlands. They include Curlew and Snipe. They feed largely on invertebrates in mud or soil.

It gets quite tricky here because some of these birds are hard to distinguish and often the pictures are taken from far away. If anyone spots an error of identification, please comment.

 The Curlew is a handsome bird with a call evocative of coastal marshes and also upland moorlands where they may breed.

The Curlew is a handsome bird with a call evocative of coastal marshes and also upland moorlands where they may breed.

The Curlew's long bill is used to probe deep into the mud in search of invertebrate food such a marine worms.

The Curlew's long bill is used to probe deep into the mud in search of invertebrate food such a marine worms.

Whimbrel are smaller than curlew with the distinctive head and eye stripes. They are present at Seaton but this example was photograhed on Dawlish Warren at the mouth of the River Exe.

Whimbrel are smaller than curlew with the distinctive head and eye stripes. They are present at Seaton but this example was photograhed on Dawlish Warren at the mouth of the River Exe.

Redshank scour the mudflats for invertebrate foods.

Redshank scour the mudflats for invertebrate foods.

Redshank will also wade deeply to feed.

Redshank will also wade deeply to feed.

Black-tailed godwits occur at Seaton in large numbers

Black-tailed godwits occur at Seaton in large numbers

Black-tailed godwits are large robust looking waders usually found on the wetland scrape or the mudflats of the estuary.

Black-tailed godwits are large robust looking waders usually found on the wetland scrape or the mudflats of the estuary.

Green sandpipers are small waders.

Green sandpipers are small waders.

Green sandpipers winter in Britain and are fairly frequently seen at the Wetlands in autumn and winter.

Green sandpipers winter in Britain and are fairly frequently seen at the Wetlands in autumn and winter.

Dunlin feeding alongside an island in the wetland scrape.

Dunlin feeding alongside an island in the wetland scrape.

Dunlin wading deeply to feed in the wetland scrape.

Dunlin wading deeply to feed in the wetland scrape.

Snipe are small Sanderlings, and are usually so distant that only the stripes on the back tell you what they are. They camouflage well with the background vegetation.

Snipe are small Sanderlings, and are usually so distant that only the stripes on the back tell you what they are. They camouflage well with the background vegetation.

A pair of Snipe were feeding in the corner of the wetland scrape, close to a solid wooden gate with small cut out sections for viewing. They were completely unaware of my presence for a few minutes photography. Serendipity!

A pair of Snipe were feeding in the corner of the wetland scrape, close to a solid wooden gate with small cut out sections for viewing. They were completely unaware of my presence for a few minutes photography. Serendipity!

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Bob Chappell 11 months, 1 week ago

Lovely series Robin.

11 months, 1 week ago Edited
Robin Fuller Replied to Bob Chappell 11 months, 1 week ago

Thanks

11 months, 1 week ago Edited
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