Seaton Wetlands' smaller birds

by Robin Fuller April. 28, 2020 190 views

There are good areas of scrub, small woodlands and hedgerows which suit smaller birds. The grasslands are good feeding grounds. Reed beds offer important habitat for several species.

Some more common species such as Blackbirds, thrush species, tits and Robins already appear in the Garden Wildife blog and are not shown again here unless a special photo merits inclusion.

Wheatears are migrant birds which I more often spot in early spring and again later summer, often flitting from post to post ahead of a frustrated photographer.

Wheatears are migrant birds which I more often spot in early spring and again later summer, often flitting from post to post ahead of a frustrated photographer.

A male Reed bunting poses obligingly

A male Reed bunting poses obligingly

A female Reed bunting in the golden light of a late afternoon in February.

A female Reed bunting in the golden light of a late afternoon in February.

A male Stonechat in a typical pose on an overhead power line.

A male Stonechat in a typical pose on an overhead power line.

A female Stonechat

A female Stonechat

Starlings line up along an overhead power line above the grazing marsh where they frequently drop down to feed.

Starlings line up along an overhead power line above the grazing marsh where they frequently drop down to feed.

Seen closer, the fine markings on the Starlings show a more attractive bird than the distant view might suggest.

Seen closer, the fine markings on the Starlings show a more attractive bird than the distant view might suggest.

The Starling is quite a handsome bird when seen in more detail - see also my ' Garden Birds - Medium' post.

The Starling is quite a handsome bird when seen in more detail - see also my ' Garden Birds - Medium' post.

The Wetlands offer ideal feeding for Swallows.

The Wetlands offer ideal feeding for Swallows.

House martins also find valuable feeding over the Wetlands. They nest in some of the hides, though this photo of an adult feeding young was taken elsewhere.

House martins also find valuable feeding over the Wetlands. They nest in some of the hides, though this photo of an adult feeding young was taken elsewhere.

I said in my 'Garden Birds -small' blog that it had taken me 10 years to get a really good picture of a wren, as they are so flighty. In fact, I had taken this one in late January but the bird was busy preening, with a very 'bad hair-day'  at the time. I'm sure she looked beautiful afterwards.

I said in my 'Garden Birds -small' blog that it had taken me 10 years to get a really good picture of a wren, as they are so flighty. In fact, I had taken this one in late January but the bird was busy preening, with a very 'bad hair-day' at the time. I'm sure she looked beautiful afterwards.

I cannot leave this part of the blog without lamenting my near futile quest for the perfect Kingfisher photo. I often see them at Seaton Wetlands - the usual flash of blue streaking by, or posing amongst or begind overhanging vegetation. There are various perching places that are Kingfisher favourites. When I arrive, I've either just missed them or, who knows, I miss them later when eventually I ran out of my short supply of patience. But if I had every wildlife photo that ever I wanted, there would be no more wildlife photo fun. Many challenges are still out there.

This Kingfisher posed very briefly on a perch by the pond in front of the Classroom hide. A bit far away but okay. It is a poor photo but at least identifies the bird adequately.

This Kingfisher posed very briefly on a perch by the pond in front of the Classroom hide. A bit far away but okay. It is a poor photo but at least identifies the bird adequately.

The Kingfisher then turned to show its better side. It was on the perch 12 seconds altogether, front and back, and then it was gone.  A few extra moments to boot the camera and adjust the settings would have been welcome but a luxury. That's wildlife photography. Point, shoot and regret later.

The Kingfisher then turned to show its better side. It was on the perch 12 seconds altogether, front and back, and then it was gone. A few extra moments to boot the camera and adjust the settings would have been welcome but a luxury. That's wildlife photography. Point, shoot and regret later.

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John Bracey 1 year, 3 months ago

Great Swift picture Robin, Which reminds me, I forgot to mention our first swallows were seen here in deepest Somerset on the 15th of April 2020, whilst installing a pergola.

1 year, 3 months ago Edited
Robin Fuller Replied to John Bracey 1 year, 2 months ago

I think you meant Swallow not Swift. Unfortunately, I have not managed yet to get a good photo of a Swift. Maybe this summer? They should be here in Sidmouth any time now.

1 year, 2 months ago Edited
Geoffhulley 1 year, 3 months ago

I once owned and lived in a property looking right up through the Axe valley which was an unbelievable sight and I had ten acres of fruit orchard so had plenty of wild life.
I was sorry to leave it really but the work became too much.

1 year, 3 months ago Edited
Robin Fuller Replied to Geoffhulley 1 year, 3 months ago

I l can imagine your reluctance to move on. Sounds a wonderful place to have lived. Our own 0.4 acre garden is precious to us. Please see the blog if you are interested.

1 year, 3 months ago Edited
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