Sri Lanka mammals

by Robin Fuller December. 22, 2020 530 views
A young male Leopard - more of him later

A young male Leopard - more of him later

There are 125 mammal species in Sri Lanka, of which I can show you just a few. I shall not give full descriptions of the mammals posted here but refer you to Wikipedia which lists the mammals and gives links to descriptions and their ecology.

Places I name in this account are described in my earlier blog on landscapes.

The Indian palm squirrel may be the smallest mammal in my set but they try to make up for it in numbers

The Indian palm squirrel may be the smallest mammal in my set but they try to make up for it in numbers

The Grizzled giant squirrel is altogether larger with a head and body length of up to 45 cm (18 in).

The Grizzled giant squirrel is altogether larger with a head and body length of up to 45 cm (18 in).

An Indian hare sunbathes in early morning sunshine

An Indian hare sunbathes in early morning sunshine

The Indian grey mongoose is native to the Indian subcontinent and West Asia

The Indian grey mongoose is native to the Indian subcontinent and West Asia

The Indian flying fox, also known as the Greater Indian fruit bat, is a species we saw in huge colonies in the Kandy botanic garden

The Indian flying fox, also known as the Greater Indian fruit bat, is a species we saw in huge colonies in the Kandy botanic garden

During daytime the flying foxes wrap themselves up using their wings as blankets, going out to feed at night

During daytime the flying foxes wrap themselves up using their wings as blankets, going out to feed at night

The Indian flying fox is one of the largest bats in the world weighing up to 1.6kg (3.5lb)

The Indian flying fox is one of the largest bats in the world weighing up to 1.6kg (3.5lb)

The wingspan is 1.2–1.5 m (4-5 ft)

The wingspan is 1.2–1.5 m (4-5 ft)

The Tufted grey langur, also known as Madras gray langur - this species is shy and keeps its distance

The Tufted grey langur, also known as Madras gray langur - this species is shy and keeps its distance

This langur has a youngster curled up on its lap

This langur has a youngster curled up on its lap

Toque macaque male

Toque macaque male

 The macaque exploits a relationship with people scrounging and stealing food

The macaque exploits a relationship with people scrounging and stealing food

Older females - like this one with a baby - develop a rosy pink complexion

Older females - like this one with a baby - develop a rosy pink complexion

Female Chital deer, also known as spotted deer

Female Chital deer, also known as spotted deer

Male Chitals have antlers and, 90cm high at shoulder height, are larger than the females

Male Chitals have antlers and, 90cm high at shoulder height, are larger than the females

A Wild boar naps awaiting visitors to the Yala National Park from whom it will scrounge food

A Wild boar naps awaiting visitors to the Yala National Park from whom it will scrounge food

But here a Wild boar is truly wild wallowing on the lakeside at Yala with an egret on its back looking for prey

But here a Wild boar is truly wild wallowing on the lakeside at Yala with an egret on its back looking for prey

A Wild water buffalo at Yala - or is it an ancestor of domesticated buffalo?

A Wild water buffalo at Yala - or is it an ancestor of domesticated buffalo?

Water buffaloes live up to their name

Water buffaloes live up to their name

A Wild water buffalo bull leaves a mud wallow

A Wild water buffalo bull leaves a mud wallow

The Sri Lankan elephant is one of three recognised subspecies of the Asian elephant. A lone male at Udawalawe. We were told that due to poaching for ivory there has been selective pressure for elephants without tusks - a sad outcome but one that helps the species survive.

The Sri Lankan elephant is one of three recognised subspecies of the Asian elephant. A lone male at Udawalawe. We were told that due to poaching for ivory there has been selective pressure for elephants without tusks - a sad outcome but one that helps the species survive.

A small group of females and young

A small group of females and young

Mum and calf

Mum and calf

Golden jackall

Golden jackall

The Leopard as pictured in the opening shot comes out to show its splendour.

The Leopard as pictured in the opening shot comes out to show its splendour.

The Leopard was a young male playing a game of 'chase' with its sister

The Leopard was a young male playing a game of 'chase' with its sister

Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins - there were hundreds around us on this boat trip from Palagama

Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins - there were hundreds around us on this boat trip from Palagama

Timing and framing your shot is tricky from a lurching boat, with fast moving dolphins, other passengers in the way and complete guesswork as to where they will appear next.

Timing and framing your shot is tricky from a lurching boat, with fast moving dolphins, other passengers in the way and complete guesswork as to where they will appear next.

Not the best of framing but the best I got

Not the best of framing but the best I got

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There are 4 comments , add yours!
Bob Chappell 9 months ago

another brilliant set Robin

9 months ago Edited
Gethin Thomas 9 months ago

Loved seeing all these again. Remember most of them in the wild in my childhood. The palm squirrel we called chipmunks, used to try catching them in the back garden. The leopard we only ever heard thudding around on the metal roof at night, never saw one in the daytime. Mongoose only ever with the snake charmer. Wild boar, our local butcher used to round up so we could have roast pork. All our milk was buffalo. One you are missing is the Slow Loris which I had as a pet, I used to have to feed her live grasshoppers. The Langur and smaller monkeys used to come through the grounds in troupes, I was terrified of the Langur as they were bigger than me back then. Fond memories. Once saw an elephant with a Maharajah on top too.

9 months ago Edited
Robin Fuller Replied to Gethin Thomas 9 months ago

Very pleased to have shared them with you. I guess you were in Sri Lanka - Ceylon as you probably knew it - for a fair while. What a privilege. It's a wonderful place. Wouldn't you just love to be there now? I hope you enjoy my other Sri Lanka posts too.

9 months ago Edited
Gethin Thomas Replied to Robin Fuller 9 months ago

Actually we were in India, but same wildlife, I guess because so close.

9 months ago Edited
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