Daher TBM 940

by John Waco Jr May. 21, 2021 135 views

The single-engined turbine market is populated by numerous aircraft of varying configurations. In broad strokes it can be broken down into two segments: fast low-winged aircraft and slower, more spacious high-winged designs.

The single-engined turbine market is populated by numerous aircraft of varying configurations. In broad strokes it can be broken down into two segments: fast low-winged aircraft and slower, more spacious high-winged designs.

In the West, these diverse offerings share a single critical component, their engine. Pratt & Whitney Canada’s PT6 family of turboprop engines is the bedrock upon which this segment has been built. “The PT6A continues to be the only engine to achieve Single Engine Instrumental Flight Rules (IFR) status for passenger revenue activity in North America, Australia, Europe and New Zealand,” the manufacturer says. In effect, the PT6 engine single-handedly killed the high-end piston-twin segment.

In addition, increased horsepower levels have allowed single-engined designs to make inroads into the twin-turbine segment. The growth of the single-engined turboprop segment is based on the near-bulletproof reliability and scalability of the PT6 family. This paradigm shift from piston-twins to turbine-singles is conceptually on par with extended twin-engine operations authorisations all but killing off three- and four-engined civil transport aircraft.

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