Day 37/365 D is for ...........

by Russell Smith February. 06, 2019 369 views

D is for .... Dough? Dinner? Dingbat hmmm that may not be a nice thing to call myself lol but I did have a dingbat moment that cost me a bit of extra work . I forgot to flour the first two as I stacked them and they stuck together , Oh well something that was easy fix . Roll into a ball divide in two and reroll them .

1 3/4 C flour, 1tsp Baking Powder, 1/8 tsp Salt, 1/4 Cup Veg shorting or Lard,1 cup Water (cool) Mix flour salt and BP, Then work the lard/veg short into flour and add water a bit at a time until you have soft dough that isnt sticky.

1 3/4 C flour, 1tsp Baking Powder, 1/8 tsp Salt, 1/4 Cup Veg shorting or Lard,1 cup Water (cool) Mix flour salt and BP, Then work the lard/veg short into flour and add water a bit at a time until you have soft dough that isnt sticky.

Wrap the dough and refrigerate for a few hours.

Flour counter and divide the dough into about 8 ish pieces .

Roll the pieces into a round disc ( turn the dough 90 deg after every stroke of the pin and turn in same direction) . If stacking them make sure you use plenty of flour to prevent them from sticking to each other .

In a dry pan or electric griddle cook on the first side until you see bubbles and the bottom is just starting to have brownish spots. 30sec-1min or so.

Flip and cook for 20-30 seconds on the other side.

Stack the finished on in a clean towel that wont leave lint and cover. This step is important the steam softens and finishes cooking them.

Now this is part of dinner as we are having breakfast for dinner and I wanted the option of breakfast tacos.

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Antonio Gil 2 years, 2 months ago

D is for damn good smile

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Antonio Gil 2 years, 2 months ago

That it was :)

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue 2 years, 2 months ago

Yes, I did this exactly as you described it in the past few years. Nevertheless they didn't look as good as yours.
#3 - is my favorite. Work in progress, which would be look good in a book too! thumbsup

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue 2 years, 2 months ago

You should have seen the first 25 times that I made them . The majority of them looked like some kind of alien amoeba.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Björn Roose 2 years, 2 months ago

I shouldn't have read this at 6 o'clock in the morning. Now I feel like eating something substantial for breakfast smile

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Björn Roose 2 years, 2 months ago

:) At 6 o'clock the only thing I want is another cup of Coffee lol.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Susan Wilde 2 years, 2 months ago

Thank you for sharing the recipe and great step by step photos.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Susan Wilde 2 years, 2 months ago

Thank you and no problems :)

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab 2 years, 2 months ago

I really like you took us through the steps. It almost sounds like naan recipe. I must try. Thanks for sharing.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Camellia Staab 2 years, 2 months ago

I am discovering that most flat breads have a very similar recipe which strikes me odd because Mexico is no way close to India and even some of the Aboriginal (Native) Americans have a similar bread but that one makes sense because of possible trade routes.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue Replied to Russell Smith 2 years, 2 months ago

Bread we found in European neolithic settlements is similar too. As soon as mankind began to settle down in Fertile Crescent and became farmers, they cooked mash and baked variations of "naan".

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue 2 years, 2 months ago

It is quite fascinating to me how similar foods appeared at or around the same time in locations that are separated by oceans or long distances.

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue Replied to Russell Smith 2 years, 2 months ago

I think, there were not so many options to prepare food from grain in an open fire:
mash, bread and some time later in history: beer! beers Maybe invented by accident: someone tried to make hard stale bread edible again by soaking in water and honey! bread honey pot At least we know, there was beer in Egypt.
In Europe we know of cups, which belong to large ceramic pots. Together they form drinking sets. Maybe "beer" is just wishful thinking of archaeologists - we love beer and wine - it's a dirty and exhausting job and nobody want to end ab as a dried mummy during work ...

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess 2 years, 2 months ago

Thanks for the lesson, Russell! Nicely done. Bet they were muy delicioso!

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Jay Boggess 2 years, 2 months ago

Si that they were .

2 years, 2 months ago Edited
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