14 Aug Lake Wateree

by Russell Smith August. 14, 2019 155 views

An early morning stroll to see what I could see was one of the first things that I did after the coffee of course.

It was a Bluebird kind of morning .

A Carolina Chickadee stuck around long enough for me to grab a few frames of it. What makes this a Carolina Chickadee is the location other that that I honestly cannot see a difference inbetween this an the Black Capped Chickadee.

Seeing as I had enough fish to eat and did not want to struggle to catch another one I took the lens and camera down to the dock to see what I could see.

I suspected correctly that the red of the Trumpet Vine would attract the Hummingbirds.

A few seconds after I grabbed this frame the one in the lower left side of the frame chased off the one on the upper right side of the frame. To me I have great respect for those that get great shots of hummingbirds because they are insanely difficult to get a shot of.

I got lucky with this frame because I was trying to get a good shot of this guy on the plant it was picking Mayflies off of. It is a Pine Warbler and they were plentiful this morning.

In the late afternoon my mom and I took another stroll to see what we could see. The Pine Warblers were still out and about but the bluebirds were hiding. She picked up my curse of what she was trying to photograph was being scarse.

This was the night I got to see the Prairie Warbler the first time but the photo was barely good enough for an id shot . Nothing I would post anywhere other than the trashcan.

We did get to watch a Great Blue Heron for a while .

One thing that I have learned to pay attention to is watch your highlights. Keep them from clipping the right side of your histogram also if there is colors in the bird watch those colors in the Luminosity histogram. I have a number of shots that I failed to pay attention to this on and well yellow or blue became white and that irritated me when I was reviewing them . With birds like the Great Blue I shoot so my histogram is to the right and I darken down the image in post processing but I do not want the highlights to touch the right side so I try to make sure I have a good amount of the histogram on the right most part but with enough space from the edge. This allows me to have enough detail in the whiter parts of the feathers.

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Tawnya Boe 2 months ago

Wow - I just left a comment on Camellia's blog about her capture of the Blue Heron. Your shot is amazing! heart eyes  We have them in Minnesota, but they are incredibly stand-offish. They fly away too quickly for me to even capture them at 200-racked out. Haha...

2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Tawnya Boe 2 months ago

200mm would be too short to get most of them around here however 200mm if you frame the shot with cropping in mind will work. Prior to getting the 150-600 I used a 70-200 f4 (canon) and would frequently crop with success. I do not know how large I could print them but I do know I could print in at least 8x10 .

2 months ago Edited
Tawnya Boe Replied to Russell Smith 2 months ago

+1smile

2 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab 2 months ago

You truly have a variety of birds flying around you. Nice captures. The bluebird is my favorite, love the colors andthe softness of the background.

2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Camellia Staab 2 months ago

Up at the lake there is a complete different set of birds due to the habitat and honestly here there is such a wide variety of habitat relatively close by.

2 months ago Edited
Pete 2 months ago

Great reminder on using the histogram. One gets caught up in the moment and forget everything else

2 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Pete 2 months ago

I have gotten so caught up I have forgotten to press the shutter button but I was watching the subject the whole time through the lens. The histogram is as much a reminder to me because I am putting it in "writing" .

2 months ago Edited
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