European Butter and Bread Dough...

by Russell Smith January. 29, 2020 365 views

One thing I have been afraid to try to make is Croissants. I finally have worked up the courage to make them for the first time. The process started yesterday 27 Jan 2020 with the making of the dough so it could chill out in the fridge and gain some extra flavor. I did not think to get any shots of that, Main reason is the lighting sucks in my house after sunset and I was too lazy to drag out any speedlights. So I start with this mornings part of the process.

Making of the Barrage or butter square.

Folding the envelope of dough over the butter in preparation for the "turns" or rolling out of the dough to create layers. A total of two turns were done here before I rolled out the dough to cut the croissants.

This is the best looking of the 6 that I was able to make out of the dough. At the time of writing this the croissants are in their final proof (rise). The next photo will be of them cooling.

This is them fresh out of the oven. Next shot will be one that is an interior shot or crumb shot.

Not the perfect honeycomb interior but it is rather nicely flavored and overall something I am going to make again. I used this recipe.

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There are 23 comments , add yours!
Bethany Plonski 9 months, 4 weeks ago

Yum, yum, yum! Deliciousness aside, what a beautifully photographed sequence!

9 months, 4 weeks ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Bethany Plonski 9 months, 3 weeks ago

Thank you :)

9 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
Lee Santiva 10 months ago

They look delicious!! smile I like the „making of“ both the food and the photoshoot

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Lee Santiva 10 months ago

Thank you :)

10 months ago Edited
Buster Bruce 10 months ago

Again, not sure to compliment you on the photos or the food itself- both outstanding!

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Buster Bruce 10 months ago

I appreciate it .

10 months ago Edited
Lynn F Medley 10 months ago

Looks so good!! Did you like them?

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Lynn F Medley 10 months ago

They were very delicious. I need to work on the interior structure and shaping but the flaky layers were great

10 months ago Edited
Lynn F Medley Replied to Russell Smith 10 months ago

Good!

10 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 10 months ago

I can almost feel the fragrance coming out of the oven.

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Antonio Gil 10 months ago

THank you the house smelled amazing with that and the chicken roasting plus butternut squash and sweet potatoes and onions

10 months ago Edited
Pete Fitzgetald 10 months ago

Bravo . . . . well done. I have come to be a big fan of your hobbies of cooking and photography, I may have to take up baking after this series

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Pete Fitzgetald 10 months ago

I discovered I was decent at baking by accident really and have come to love it although with foods I love trying new things even if it is a fail. Baking is not hard as people think or make it seem. My suggestion would be get a scale and if the recipe is not in grams or ounces to convert it to weight. It is easier and quicker to me and also easier to figure out if something went wrong. Start with a simple white bread recipe from say King Arthur Flour's website. Sadly if you start making bread on a regular basis storebought will taste well not as good to put it politely. Also thank you for the compliment.

10 months ago Edited
Camellia Staab 10 months ago

Excellent,excellent series. The captures are very, very nice and of course the croissants look amazing. Years, years ago I tried my hand at making them. They truly are a work of love because of the time consumption in their preparation. But when made correctly where they are crisp and crumbly on the outside and slightly chewy on the inside, there is nothing like them. My favorite are chocolate croissants, but regular croissant , warm, with butter is wonderful as well. Thanks for sharing the entire series and the recipe.

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Camellia Staab 10 months ago

Honestly labor wise they are much less labor intensive than a loaf of sourdough. Tedious factor for Croissants is much higher though. A level of precision and attention to detail is needed. I do want to do a chocolate croissant but I think I would be the only one to eat them or me and my daughter (if she wants to tempt fate). As with the recipe I made I would have to use a dark dark chocolate to counter the richness. I did have one that was warm and had butter but it was almost too rich to eat.

10 months ago Edited
Björn Roose 10 months ago

Looks good smile Can't help however, being European, wondering what European butter is ? And how is it different from American butter ?

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Björn Roose 10 months ago

Butter fat differences and cultured. American butter is only around 80% fat where European butter is 82% or higher and is also cultured in the process of making it (not all but most). So it has a bit different flavor and is richer. In the case of this the 2-4% is a big difference.

10 months ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Russell Smith 10 months ago

Aha, that's interesting. And is European butter advertised as such then or do you just know which brand you need ?

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Björn Roose 10 months ago

It requires a bit of research and reading of the package. There is an irish butter that is common and quite good but has a bit of a price to it. I went with a Finish brand for this one it actually had a bit more butterfat in it and was 1/2 the price of the irish (it was on sale). The thing we have to pay attention to is there are a few brands that sell European Style meaning it is cultured but still has a lower butterfat. I know when I was younger and had my dairy (it was quite small) I would make my own butter and I did not have to worry about the fat content because the cow I was using to provide the cream had an absurdly high butterfat content in her milk. She was one of the top in her breed in the states at that time.

10 months ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Russell Smith 10 months ago

Good, greasy times smile

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Björn Roose 10 months ago

grinning

10 months ago Edited
Lee Santiva Replied to Russell Smith 10 months ago

If I may join the conversation…I think the difference is also what the cows get to eat. Butter from Alpine cows tastes sweet  I think because they eat just what is growing in the meadows without „additives“. I can definitely taste the difference between Irish and German butter. The trend here is to add canola oil to keep it softer for easier spreading (not necessarily baking)

10 months ago Edited
Russell Smith Replied to Lee Santiva 10 months ago

Diet is a huge factor in butter and flavor. I know I loved the cream in spring unless they found some wild onions or garlic.

10 months ago Edited
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