The Lonely Mountain of Großmugl

by Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue August. 03, 2018 2087 views

The village Großmugl ("big mound") is named after this big tumulus. The so called Leeberg is a listed archaeological burial site. The tumulus is still 14 m high and reaches about 50 m in diameter. Nearby is another, smaller tumulus, which was excavated in the 1950s. Although a lot of ceramics were found the scientific outcome wasn't satisfying. The big Leeberg itself will remain untouched, until it will be necessary to dig it up.

Keeping something impressive and almost unique like that as save as possible is more important, instead of destroying it by digging it up. Leeberg is a perfect photo model, because it is well visible situated on top of hill, high above the village. It is also visible from the other side of the village too.

Such gigantic burial mounds were built during Early Iron Age (Hallstatt Culture 8th to 6th century BC). The Leeberg of Großmugl is a very prominent and good visible archaeological site, but it’s not the largest tumuli in Austria. It's just a large and good visible example. Never fully believe in Wikipedia or schoolbooks!

In Burgenland, eastern Part of Austria, nearby the Hungarian border is a large burial ground with more than 280 tumuli. Some of them even larger than the more famous Leeberg. Because this large burial site was never used for farming and was almost forever overgrown by trees the tumuli are in far better condition than this big "lonely mountains" in the middle of farm land in Lower Austria. Some of them are so well preserved, that the ditch around the tumulus, were the earth was taken, to built the grave, is still visible. Another one of them is half finished. It looks like a round "step pyramid".

Sadly some of them were opened by bored noble families of the region during the late 19th century. They look like slaughtered giants.

During WWII defense systems for big weapons and trenches for the soldiers were built right through the burial site. If treasure searching idiots try to dig in this area, they will doing it on very dangerous ground. Although bomb squads cleared the area, there will be still enough dangerous bits and pieces of WWII left. At least my brother-in-law, he was the assigned archaeologist of Burgenland, and I found enough dangerous stuff during a rescue excavation. It's never funny to find ammunition, grenades or bombs – at least I’m not very fond about finding such remains and calling in the bomb squad.

It's almost impossible to take pictures of this more preserved but hidden graves. If you step back, the trees will hide the tumulus. If you step forward, nothing but rotting leaves and twigs will be in the pictures.

Leeberg of Großmugl, Lower Austria. My husband on the right had to play the "levelling staff" (1.7 m).

Leeberg of Großmugl, Lower Austria. My husband on the right had to play the "levelling staff" (1.7 m).

On the right side of Leeberg is the smaller tumulus visible.

On the right side of Leeberg is the smaller tumulus visible.

View from the other side of the village in direction of Leeberg.

View from the other side of the village in direction of Leeberg.

Burial site with a spectacular view - to see and to be seen ...

Burial site with a spectacular view - to see and to be seen ...

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There are 7 comments , add yours!
Pete Fitzgetald 1 year, 11 months ago

what a cool history lesson and photos

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue Replied to Pete Fitzgetald 1 year, 11 months ago

Thanks! blush

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
David Swatton 1 year, 11 months ago

Interesting. It’s a shame someone vandalised it by sticking that cross on top.

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue Replied to David Swatton 1 year, 11 months ago

joy joy joy Lot discussion about this cross - but this is a bigoted very catholic country. Everywhere is a cross standing or hanging, although the people don't think, speak or act in a Christian way. In official buildings or schools are crosses in every class room. On the left and on the right is very often the picture of the president and some other politician.  History repeats itself: Jesus died between two seedy characters.

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 1 year, 11 months ago

If this is a tumulus, the guy buried inside must be a giant smile Just kidding. Thanks for explaining it for us dear friend

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
Scribe 1 year, 11 months ago

These mounds of memories
quieten every onlooker
shrouding us in wise reveries
as we gaze in calm stupors 
and smile at our future fates,
before each sees the humour
at heaven's eternal gatescandy

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
Sigrid Strohschneider-Laue Replied to Scribe 1 year, 11 months ago

Wow beautiful said! Thanks blush

1 year, 11 months ago Edited
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