Skara Brae and Ring of Brodgar

by Stuartbarbara April. 18, 2019 290 views
Today we went to an exceptional Neolithic village site. It was uncovered by a huge storm from the west which washed away sand covering part of the site. This lead to extensive archeological research at this site. Many houses were uncovered and it is believed that older houses are buried underneath

Today we went to an exceptional Neolithic village site. It was uncovered by a huge storm from the west which washed away sand covering part of the site. This lead to extensive archeological research at this site. Many houses were uncovered and it is believed that older houses are buried underneath

A drawing of a suggestion of how the village might have appeared 5000 years ago. Interestingly, the houses were connected with covered walkways, allowed the people to move about inside the protected village. The surrounding land was abundant with farm produce, animals and fish.

A drawing of a suggestion of how the village might have appeared 5000 years ago. Interestingly, the houses were connected with covered walkways, allowed the people to move about inside the protected village. The surrounding land was abundant with farm produce, animals and fish.

This recreation of a house is startlingly clean, but accurate of the setup.. The “dresser” was a focal point and was storage for essential or treasured things. The central hearth was for warmth and cooking. It was surprisingly warm inside just out of the wind. Beside me is a bed space.

This recreation of a house is startlingly clean, but accurate of the setup.. The “dresser” was a focal point and was storage for essential or treasured things. The central hearth was for warmth and cooking. It was surprisingly warm inside just out of the wind. Beside me is a bed space.

The original homes are now uncovered for tourism and well maintained. Recent lack of rain has necessitated watering the new grass

The original homes are now uncovered for tourism and well maintained. Recent lack of rain has necessitated watering the new grass

You do get a sense of the village with all the homes in close proximity. The space above was not a home but a workshop.

You do get a sense of the village with all the homes in close proximity. The space above was not a home but a workshop.

Another dresser for storage

Another dresser for storage

From Skara Brae, we went to the Ring of Brodgar. We had actually taken this photo the evening we arrived as we are staying nearby. The light was very evocative.

From Skara Brae, we went to the Ring of Brodgar. We had actually taken this photo the evening we arrived as we are staying nearby. The light was very evocative.

Today we returned for a guided walk by a ranger

Today we returned for a guided walk by a ranger

Wild Primulas in bloom

Wild Primulas in bloom

And Marsh Marigold. The area below the Ring was very marshy.

And Marsh Marigold. The area below the Ring was very marshy.

These stones are very imposing. You can see the henge, or ditch around the site. This took a huge amount of work as it was dug into bedrock before the age of metal tools.

These stones are very imposing. You can see the henge, or ditch around the site. This took a huge amount of work as it was dug into bedrock before the age of metal tools.

No one knows the original number of stones. It was thought that there were 60, but that is an educated guess.

No one knows the original number of stones. It was thought that there were 60, but that is an educated guess.

Through modern geophysics, the central area is sterile, without a hearth or burial place. The stones were brought from various regions and the people may have come for ceremonies and gathered at their regional clan  stone.  That also is just a guess.

Through modern geophysics, the central area is sterile, without a hearth or burial place. The stones were brought from various regions and the people may have come for ceremonies and gathered at their regional clan stone. That also is just a guess.

From a distance, the stones are certainly some form of marker. But the origin n remains a mystery.

From a distance, the stones are certainly some form of marker. But the origin n remains a mystery.

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Björn Roose 6 months ago

I do definitely have to visit the Orkneys one day. Seen, I think, nearly everything neolithical in Brittany and The Netherlands, but haven't crossed the Channel yet to do the same. Interesting series of photos.

6 months ago Edited
Stuartbarbara Replied to Björn Roose 6 months ago

Yes, you should try to visit here. A treasure trove of Neolithic and Iron Age finds. Think the area has been underdeveloped for centuries so those sites were ignored. Basically farm land about and then the archaeologists came looking. Very impressive stone work and so beautifully constructed 5000 years ago. Amazing!

6 months ago Edited
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