Stones of Stenness and Kirkwall

by Stuartbarbara April. 18, 2019 215 views
Went on a guided talk on the Standing Stones of Stenness. Excellent guide. There had been ten stones but a 19century farmer dynamited many to make room for plowing. Seems inconceivable now. These stones predate the Eqyptian pyramids

Went on a guided talk on the Standing Stones of Stenness. Excellent guide. There had been ten stones but a 19century farmer dynamited many to make room for plowing. Seems inconceivable now. These stones predate the Eqyptian pyramids

There had been a small Bronze Age village nearby. This is a reconstruction of that village.

There had been a small Bronze Age village nearby. This is a reconstruction of that village.

The tomb of John Rae, arctic explorer and discoverer of the final link in the Northwest Passage. He is sadly little known today but did much more than any other European to explore the Canadian Arctic.

The tomb of John Rae, arctic explorer and discoverer of the final link in the Northwest Passage. He is sadly little known today but did much more than any other European to explore the Canadian Arctic.

St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall. Beautiful simplicity in its design. Was a Catholic Church but now Anglican.

St Magnus Cathedral in Kirkwall. Beautiful simplicity in its design. Was a Catholic Church but now Anglican.

The Earl’s Palace in Kirkwall. Built by Patrick Stewart, Earl of Orkney and son of Robert, who built the Earl’s Palace at Birsay. Patrick and his son raised a rebellion against the government in Edinburgh. Both were executed and the palace was left to ruin

The Earl’s Palace in Kirkwall. Built by Patrick Stewart, Earl of Orkney and son of Robert, who built the Earl’s Palace at Birsay. Patrick and his son raised a rebellion against the government in Edinburgh. Both were executed and the palace was left to ruin

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David Stringer 5 months, 3 weeks ago

Wow, I’ve enjoyed your photos and comments immensely.  I didn’t realize that there’s so much history on the Orkneys. Seeing these places without dozens of people around must have made it much more meaningful.

Very fitting that the body of John Rae was brought back to the Orkneys. His tomb appropriately depicts the great explorer he was. Some day I too would love to visit his resting place.

The Cathedral seems to have a mixture of the round Romanesque arches in the nave and the pointed Gothic arches in the roof. Maybe the roof was replaced at a later date.

Cheers,
David

5 months, 3 weeks ago Edited
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