Cumberland Island - Dungeness Ruins

by Bethany Plonski July. 15, 2019 241 views

Cumberland Island is uninhabited now, but it used to be a playground for the rich and famous (like nearby Jekyll Island). Thomas Carnegie, the brother of Andrew Carnegie, owned 90% of the island at one point and built a 35,000-square-foot, 59-room mansion there in the 1880s. The property was named Dungeness after a hunting lodge that was built on the island in 1736 by James Oglethorpe, the founder of the original Georgia colony (and, fun fact, the namesake of my alma mater).

The Carnegies abandoned Dungeness by 1925, and in 1959 the mansion was burned, possibly on purpose. I read one article that said the fire could be seen all the way from St. Mary's for three whole days.

Today the National Park Service owns the ruins, and the most popular day hike through the island passes right through them.

I don't have much natural inclination for this type of photo, and I knew I had an architecture assignment coming up for my class, so I intended to be more thorough and methodical about these shots, but there were two big distractions.

First, we found more horses, including the two foals you saw here.

And second, we realized there was an osprey nest on the top of one of the chimneys.

And the nest had babies! The chimney was pretty high up there, so the quality on these isn't great, but how cute is that little one popping his head up out of the back of the nest?

I can't say I'm disappointed about either of these distractions. :) My heart is always with nature.

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Bill Baird 1 year, 6 months ago

Beautiful set !

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Bill Baird 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you, Bill! Such a beautiful place to visit.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Russell Smith 1 year, 6 months ago

I love this series.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Russell Smith 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you! It was such a wonderful visit that I think I'm hooked. I'm already thinking of going back when the weather is cooler. smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 1 year, 6 months ago

Actually, I prefer the distractions grinning

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Antonio Gil 1 year, 6 months ago

Thanks! I did too! There were so many wonderful distractions on this island, it was such a memorable experience. smile

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

Interesting series. Up where I live we have a Dungeness River, Dungeness Bay and Dungeness Crabs!
Love the bonus horses & ospreys! Nice work, architecturally & animal life wise, as well!

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

Thanks, Jay! There must have been a lot of English people settling the area, because I read that that is where the name Dungeness originally came from. I was so excited to see the osprey - they are a pretty rare sight here and such majestic-looking birds.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

I think you are absolutely right about the early settlers...
We're really fortunate to have lots of birds of prey around where I am.
Mostly: Bald Eagles, Kites, Red Tailed Hawks, Osprey, Sparrow Hawks, etc.....plus every kind of sea bird.....

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

I would love it! I especially enjoy seeing sea birds - they always seem to have interesting characteristics and habits.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

Let me know if you get out this way, so I can show you around, if you'd like!grinning

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Jay Boggess 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you! That would be super cool!

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Jay Boggess Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

+1smile+1

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Björn Roose 1 year, 6 months ago

#12 looks like a good combination of nature and architecture to me smile And of human architecture going to waste, while animal architecture and life flourishes ...

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Björn Roose 1 year, 6 months ago

Thank you! I think so too. That was one of the best things about visiting, being reminded of nature's persistence. It's getting more and more rare to find situations where the animal and human elements are reversed that way.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

I'm pretty sure it will all be "reversed" in that way again in the end. Alas, if we go on like this, there'll be no more humans to witness that.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Björn Roose 1 year, 6 months ago

That is the truth. Today at lunch, a person I worked with said they didn't care to be bothered with environmental issues when choosing a candidate to vote for, because they wouldn't be alive when the sh*t hit the fan anyway. I was like, thanks for that. BIG SIGH.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

People don't even see the shit is hitting the fan already apparently ... Anyway, I would give my vote to a candidate who does care and does have any idea about the way to go, but I have not seen any of the kind yet, however "green" they consider themselves.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Bethany Plonski Replied to Björn Roose 1 year, 6 months ago

I hear you on that one. Sadly, there are days when I'd just be happy to know that the person in office wasn't mentally ill and a blatant criminal.

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
Björn Roose Replied to Bethany Plonski 1 year, 6 months ago

Trust me, if you're on this side of the ocean one US president is just like the other one: after a while they all seem mentally ill and blatant criminals joy

1 year, 6 months ago Edited
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