[#41]

by Sri V November. 02, 2020 210 views

With a second Covid-19 inflicted lockdown now in force, the next safest thing to staying at home is being out where there are fewer people. In that sense, people would probably avoid indoor locales where it might be more difficult to maintain the advised distance? But given the mass of people outdoors during weekends whether it be walking, doing sports or just hanging about, could indoors actually be safer? Then again, what if everyone has the same thought? I will just stay at home to recover from the sickness of over-thinking. Thank you.

After many cups of hot tea and probing around in the archives, a handful of images from our visit to an aviation museum a few years ago seemed worth sharing. The Schleissheim airfield, on which the museum is located, was established in 1912 as the first airfield for the Royal Bavarian Flying Corps.

Frame of Wolfmüller glider

Frame of Wolfmüller glider

Otto Lilienthal hang glider. It was steered by shifting the weight of the pilot.

Otto Lilienthal hang glider. It was steered by shifting the weight of the pilot.

Otto Biplane

Otto Biplane

The airfield served both military and civil purposes and its eventful history is a reflection of the development of aviation in Germany. Below one of the first long-winged motorised gliders as inventors searched for means other than wind to propel the flying machines.

Motorised glider

Motorised glider

From the humble beginnings of a handful of pioneers, the journey takes us to the propeller-powered birds of the world wars.

Focke-Wulf 44 Stieglitz biplane

Focke-Wulf 44 Stieglitz biplane

One of the well-known German fighters of World War 2, the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

One of the well-known German fighters of World War 2, the Messerschmitt Bf 109.

Douglas DC-3. It was used by the Allied forces as a passenger and transport aircraft during the second World War.

Douglas DC-3. It was used by the Allied forces as a passenger and transport aircraft during the second World War.

Though the race was on to mass produce jet-engine powered fighter aircrafts, they arrived a little too late to bolster Germany's chances in the WWII. Following the end of the war the German jet aircraft and jet engines were studied by the allies and contributed to work on early Soviet and US jet fighters. (source)

F-4 Phantom II supersonic fighter plane used by the US Air Force in the Vietnam War.

F-4 Phantom II supersonic fighter plane used by the US Air Force in the Vietnam War.

Naturally, the jet engines also had civilian applications as in the satellite launcher jointly developed by Great Britain, France and Germany in the later decades of the 20th century.

A three-stage satellite launcher rocket known as the Europa Launcher.

A three-stage satellite launcher rocket known as the Europa Launcher.

Although I don't promise that the presented "facts" are indeed accurate, hope the post was nonetheless interesting. It was quite the experience from photography point of view as well with the subjects packed so closely to one another. Achieving the necessary separation to draw attention to the "intended" subject was a challenge and a lot of times unsuccessful.

Gliding on angel's wings...if used for civilian applications.

Gliding on angel's wings...if used for civilian applications.

The thrill of being airborne for the first time even as a passenger at a time when flying wasn't so commonplace must really have been something. Keeping with the timeless words professed by a beloved spaceman, "To Infinity and Beyond!"

Sunset on the airfield

Sunset on the airfield

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There are 4 comments , add yours!
Benny Law 5 months ago

Like Antonio, I love aircraft and the flying experience. Interesting post.

5 months ago Edited
Sri V Replied to Benny Law 5 months ago

Thanks Benny! grinning

5 months ago Edited
Antonio Gil 5 months, 1 week ago

Love aviation and all things related. Cool post

5 months, 1 week ago Edited
Sri V Replied to Antonio Gil 5 months ago

Thanks Antonio! grinning

5 months ago Edited
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